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Our bone broth recipe is embarrassingly easy and better than store-bought

bone broth recipe

Two bowls of bone broth.
Bluebird Provisions / Pexels

Using bone broth in recipes is a simple substitute for traditional stock that offers a ton of amazing benefits. This superfood “trend” started a few years ago yet continues to remain popular thanks to the amazing health benefits of bone broth, such as strengthened bones and improved joint health.

Bone broth is a clear liquid often used as a base for soups and stews. Unlike stock, bone broth requires a lengthy cooking time where the animal bones simmer, resulting in a liquid that is full of protein, collagen, and other health benefits. The bones of a chicken release many vitamins and minerals, such as calcium and magnesium, into the broth, as well as important amino acids like glycine. Many people following intermittent fasting diets also enjoy using bone broth to comfortably break a fast, since it is easy on the digestive system.

As you browse through the soup and stock aisle at the grocery store, you’ll find many pre-packaged bone broths to choose from — including beef and chicken varieties. But making your bone broth at home is simple, incredibly delicious, and freezes well.

bone broth in a glass cup on a light background, selective focus
Carey / Adobe Stock

How to make bone broth at home

Making your bone broth at home is so much easier than you’d think. Many people shy away from making bone broth at home since it requires a simmer on the stovetop for up to 24 hours. Instead, using an instant pot helps create a delicious bone broth in only two hours. The basics of bone broth include chicken broth, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt. However, we recommend adding in the extra vegetables and herbs to give your bone broth more flavor and nutrients.

Ingredients

  • bones from (1) 3-4lb. chicken
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • Water
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 medium carrots, scrubbed and cut in half
  • 1 medium parsnip, scrubbed and cut into large chunks (may substitute more carrots, if desired)
  • 3 celery ribs (or ends and leaves to equal 1 cup)
  • 1 large yellow onion, quartered with skin and root end intact
  • 6 garlic cloves, lightly smashed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 810 peppercorns
  • A handful of fresh herbs(sage, rosemary, thyme, and/or parsley)

Method

  1. Place bones, vegetables, peppercorns, herbs, and vinegar into the pot of the Instant Pot.
  2. Add enough water to just cover the bones and vegetables in the pot, about 3/4 full.
  3. Wipe the rim of the insert dry with a towel. Place lid on Instant Pot and lock into place.
  4. Flip the vent valve to ‘Sealing’.
  5. Select ‘Manual’ or High-Pressure setting and adjust the cooking time to 120 minutes.
  6. Optional: to ensure a gelatinous bone broth, run the cycle a second time for 120 minutes on low pressure.
  7. When cooking is done, allow pressure to release naturally (10-20 minutes).
  8. Release any residual pressure using the vent valve before removing the lid.
  9. Allow broth to cool before straining it into jars through a mesh-lined strainer for storage.
  10. Add salt to taste.
Bone broth.
Bluebird Provisions / Unsplash

Homemade bone broth vs. store-bought

Not only is making your bone broth incredibly easy, but making your own over store-bought can help you save money, too. Store-bought bone broth usually costs between $3.50 and $5.00 for a 32-ounce carton. The price it costs to make at home depends on the cost of your ingredients, but overall you’re likely to get a better bang for your buck. If you’re consuming a lot of bone broth regularly, such as part of a bone broth diet, purchasing store-bought bone broth can quickly add up. Extra bone broth can easily be frozen for future use, too!

Homemade bone broth also has a different taste than you’ll find in a carton. You may find that homemade bone broth is richer, more flavorful, and less salty than packaged carton varieties. At home, you can also control the vegetables used in the recipe which can result in a richer, more nutrient-dense bone broth than in store-bought versions.

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Emily Caldwell
Emily is a full time freelance writer with a special focus on health, fitness, lifestyle, food, and nutrition topics. She…
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