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Utah’s Luxurious Camp Sarika Retreat Is at the Heart of 5 National Parks

Few life experiences are as beautiful, humbling, calming, eerie, and awe-inspiring as standing in the middle of a desert. With a vast, otherworldly landscape stretching in every direction, it’s enough to turn anyone into an existential philosopher, if only for a moment. One of the most renowned U.S. resorts is looking to capture that feeling — plus a healthy dose of high-end luxury amenities to boot — with an exclusive, all-new desert camp.

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It looks like an exotic luxury camp in the heart of Africa. Statesiders seeking a proper digital detox might be surprised to learn that this world-class retreat is situated in Canyon Point, near Utah’s border with Arizona. With privileged access to the Navajo Nation Reservation and five national parks, including Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bryce Canyon, it’s an ideal place to unwind and get back to nature.

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Next year, the otherworldly landscape will be the site of the all-new Camp Sarika by Amangiri. The exclusive retreat will feature a cluster of 10 canvas-topped guest pavilions designed to blend seamlessly into the surrounding landscape. All will offer high-end amenities, including designer interiors, luxury bedding, and dedicated living and dining areas. A private terrace attached to each tent will guarantee panoramic sunset views, plus access to a fire pit and heated plunge pool. For guests who can find a reason to leave their rooms, the camp will also house shared amenities like a communal lounge, a wellness center, a restaurant, and even a spa tent.

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The new retreat is a niche extension of Utah’s existing Amangiri. Situated on 600 acres of dramatic red rock country, the five-star hotel resort is a literal oasis in the middle of nowhere. It’s a remote location where guests are encouraged to hike, climb, learn about the local Navajo culture, and embrace the rejuvenating properties of the desert. The new retreat’s daily adventure program will take advantage of it all with guided mountain and desert hikes, slot canyon expeditions, and even its own exclusive via ferrata route.

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Camp Sarika is expected to open in April 2020 with nightly room rates starting at $3,800. If Utah isn’t far enough removed from the hustle of your daily life, check out the best luxury African safari retreats that redefine glamping.

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Mike Richard
Mike Richard has traveled the world since 2008. He's kayaked in Antarctica, tracked endangered African wild dogs in South…
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