Skip to main content

Why You Should Buy a Pizza Oven on Amazon Prime Day

One of my favorite things about Amazon Prime Day is that it’s the perfect excuse to buy things you don’t need. And perhaps one of the most frivolous purchases you can make is a portable pizza oven.

Does anyone really need their own pizza oven? No, of course not. You can make pizza from scratch with just your regular oven. That being said, I recently got my hands on the Ooni Koda outdoor pizza oven and I am never going back to regular oven pizzas. So if you’re thinking of buying a pizza oven of your own during Amazon Prime Day, here’s why I think you totally should.

Why You Should Buy a Pizza Oven

Image used with permission by copyright holder

If you love making pizzas, eating pizzas, and sharing pizzas with friends, then you will probably like owning your own pizza oven. The main reason you should buy a pizza oven, however, is purely for that crisp and delicious crust that it can provide.

The problem with cooking pizza in a traditional oven is that it just doesn’t get hot enough to cook that pie properly. Even if you own a pizza stone, your oven isn’t going to reach high enough temperatures to ensure you get a crisp crust with adequately melted toppings.

The increased heat that pizza ovens provide also allows you to cook more pizzas faster. Some of the more expensive options, like the Ooni Koda 16, allow you to cook pizzas in just 60 seconds. This makes it a great appliance for backyard events either at home or at a friend’s house.

Amazon will probably have deals on pizza ovens for Prime Day

Though we can’t anticipate all of the deals Amazon will have available on Prime Day, it’s highly likely there will be some good discounts on pizza ovens available tomorrow. Some of the biggest price cuts are almost always Prime Day appliance deals and these devices just so happen to fall under that category.

Which Pizza Oven Should You Buy?

There are a lot of different pizza ovens you can buy on Amazon right now, and short of testing them all, I can’t really tell you which one you should buy. That being said, there are really only two types to consider: Indoor and outdoor pizza ovens.

Indoor Pizza Ovens

Indoor pizza ovens tend to be smaller appliances that closely resemble a toaster. They tend to be much cheaper than their outdoor counterparts and can be easily stored in your kitchen if you have the counter space for them. The main downside is that many of the options available really only allow you to make personal-sized pizzas.

Outdoor Pizza Ovens

Outdoor pizza ovens, though more expensive, tend to be more impressive. Unlike indoor ovens, they tend to be gas-powered or function similar to a pellet grill. The main thing you want to look out for when buying an outdoor pizza oven is whether or not it’s portable. If you don’t have an outdoor space that can permanently hold a pizza oven, you’ll likely want a smaller, more portable option.

Editors' Recommendations

Jacob Kienlen
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Jacob Kienlen was a culture writer for The Manual. Born and raised in Portland, Oregon, he has considered the Northwest his…
Why you should stock up on honey, sugar, salt, and white rice
No need for expiration dates here — these shelf-stable ingredients will last for years
Honey jar

According to Feeding America, a U.S.-based nonprofit organization consisting of more than 200 food banks, Americans waste 119 billion pounds of food every year. And while commercial food waste makes up more than half of that amount, wasted food from individual homes accounts for about 40%. As shocking as this amount may seem at first glance, it makes sense when we stop to consider how many times per month we rifle through our refrigerators, tossing something that seems to have wilted overnight or sprouted some fuzzy green hairs since you last opened the lid. Straight into the trash those things go, along with our money and good intentions.

Thankfully, though, there are some ingredients that magically will never go bad -- ingredients that, in some cases, have far longer shelf lives than we do. These are the ingredients that, with proper care, will never see the inside of a soggy, wet coffee ground-infested garbage bag.

Read more
Absinthe is mysterious and luscious – an expert tells us which bottles you should buy
What is absinthe and what bottles should you try?
Absinthe in glass next to a bottle with a black background

There are few spirits as misunderstood as absinthe. We dare you to find one spirit as misunderstood as absinthe. There’s a good chance, even with very little information to back anything up, you already have some preconceived ideas about it. You might believe that it’s a hallucinogenic and after a few sips, you start seeing a green fairy flying every which way. You might even think that is why this alcohol was banned in the U.S. for so long. It’s not.

"The truth is that most of these claims are not true, as overindulging in this spirit leads to the same issues as with any other," said James Couty, food and beverage manager at Pendry Chicago and Chateau Carbide in Chicago, Illinois. "The 'Green Muse,' as it was commonly referred to during its heyday of the Grand Epoque, a period where expressionist painters and poets such as Edgar Allen Poe were creating their historic artworks, inspired and delighted the masses."

Read more
Why you should never buy shredded cheese at the store
Grated cheese isn't that hard to make anyway
Grated cheese

It's one of those things that's become so normalized that we don't even consider it a convenience item anymore. Cheese comes grated. That's how we often use it, so that's how we buy it. End of story. But there was a time when cheese didn't come in a convenient zip-top package. Until 1958, when Sargento first shredded some cheddar and put it in a bag, we had to do the hard work ourselves. Now, those convenient bags of shredded cheese come in every size, in countless cheesy varieties, making homemade enchiladas and casseroles easier than ever. Unfortunately, though, as with most things, that convenience comes at a cost -- even grated cheese.

It's expensive
The most obvious cost is literal -- pre-shredded cheese is far more expensive than blocks of the good stuff -- no matter if you're talking about Kraft cheese, Sargento cheese, or any other brand. The more prep work the brand does for you, the higher your grocery bill. On average, pre-shredded cheese costs about $1.50 more per cup than block cheese. When you do the math, those savings are pretty significant.

Read more