Skip to main content

Canadian Club Releases a 42-Year-Old Whisky

The second release in Canadian Club’s CC Chronicles series is a 42-year-old Canadian whisky, also named Issue No. 2: The Dock Man. This slightly awkward name is meant as a tribute to the dock workers who helped the whisky keep flowing during the lean years of Prohibition. No. 2 is one year older than the last CC Chronicles release, 2018’s 41-year-old Water of Windsor. “For more than 150 years, we’ve consistently delivered quality expressions to whisky drinkers, and the release of Canadian Club 42 Year Old continues this tradition,” said global whisky ambassador Tish Harcus in a prepared statement. “Following the success of our first CC Chronicles release last year, we’re excited to unveil another premium, distinctive whisky that endures the test of time.”

Canadian Club 42 Year Old
Image used with permission by copyright holder

When it comes to aging, Canadian whisky is more like Scotch than bourbon, in that it can spend decades inside a barrel and still taste pretty good. The cooler climate up north means that long maturation periods don’t completely destroy the flavor of the whisky with astringent tannin and oak notes, as it often does in Kentucky. With this whisky you’ll find rich brown sugar and molasses on the nose, and dried cherry, vanilla, and maple syrup on the palate. At 90 proof, there’s a little bit of welcome heat here as well. Ultimately, this does not drink like an over-aged four-decade-old whisky, and that’s a good thing. Representatives for the brand won’t give details regarding the mash bill, but they confirmed that the whisky was aged in American oak barrels (the exact type were not revealed) for the entirety of its maturation.

This is not the final release planned for the CC Chronicles range. There will be releases in coming years up to 45 years old, and following that will be a five-year skip to a 50-year-old whisky.

Canadian Club 42 will retail for an SRP of $300.

Editors' Recommendations

Jonah Flicker
Jonah Flicker is a freelance writer who covers booze, travel, food, and lifestyle. His work has appeared in a variety of…
Whiskey vs Whisky: Is There Really a Difference?
whiskey vs whisky

When we were allowed to go to bars (remember the long, long ago?), we used to wish we had a nickel for every time the issue of the proper spelling of whisk(e)y would come up. By now, we'd probably be able to afford a bottle, even if it's just a cheap one. With not a whole lot else to do right now, though, it's time to set the record straight. You won't need to argue with your buddies anymore, because here is the lowdown on the whisky vs. whiskey debate.

To put it bluntly, there's absolutely no difference between the two aside from spelling. Whiskey and whisky are the same basic liquid -- they both refer to the delicious alcohol made from fermented grain mash, and aged in oak barrels for varying amounts of time. The final product will be different (bourbon vs. Scotch whisky, et cetera), but whiskey and whisky are both, in short, whisk(e)y.

Read more
Chivas Releases Extra 13 Collection Scotch Whiskies
Whiskey in a glass

It appears that the new Scotch Whisky Association rules allowing Scotch to be finished in a larger variety of cask types has been a welcome boon to the industry, which has been taking advantage of this new way to innovate. Just last month, Dewar's launched Ilegal Smooth, an eight-year-old blended whisky finished in Ilegal Mezcal casks.

And now Chivas, owned by drinks company Pernod Ricard, has followed suit with its Chivas Extra 13 collection, a series of 13-year-old blends that are finished in different types of barrels. The new lineup consists of the following expressions: Chivas Extra 13 Oloroso Sherry Cask, Chivas Extra 13 Rum Cask, Chivas Extra 13 American Rye Cask, and Chivas Extra 13 Tequila Cask.

Read more
Redbreast Master Blender Talks New 27-Year-Old Expression
redbreast whiskey bottle

Redbreast, one of Ireland's most popular single pot still whiskeys, recently introduced the oldest expression in its core range, a 27-year-old whiskey matured in bourbon, port, and sherry casks. Master blender Billy Leighton and apprentice blender Dave McCabe were scheduled to travel to New York City earlier this month to launch the new expression, but those plans were disrupted, as was the entire world, by the coronavirus. Still, we were able to catch up with Leighton, an expert in all things Irish whiskey, over email to talk about this new release and the current state of Irish whiskey in general.

The Manual: How do you think Irish whiskey stands up to older age statements? Is it comparable to Scotch, or is the climate different enough to have a profound effect?

Read more