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The 7 Best Outdoor Sport Sunglasses for Adventurous Men

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When getting ready for an outdoor adventure, men’s sunglasses are optional for some people. For us, they are absolutely necessary. Hiking? Bring ‘em. Running? Bring ‘em. Traveling? Bring ‘em. They don’t weigh much and when you’re spending hard-earned time and money to have fun, don’t waste these experiences squinting the whole time.

Some sunglasses excel at one thing, like mountaineering, for example. Others are generalists, and easily transition from running to fishing to setting up the barbecue grill like a champ. These are the best multifunctional sport sunglasses for men that you can try out for yourself.

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Zeal Divide

Zeal Divide
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Zeal is pushing the limits of how sustainable good sunglasses can be. Gone are the days when sunglasses could be unsustainable. The brand’s new Divide sunglasses are made from the new See Grass material which blends recycled plastic bottles and agricultural waste from hemp, flax, rice, and straw. The whole process is powered by biogas.

The Ellume polarized lenses have excellent color, clarity, and contrast and are made from a plant-based plastic polymer called Z-Resin. ProFlex rubber injections on the nose and arms keep things comfy against your head.

Smith Caravan MAG

Smith Caravan MAG
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No lens is perfect for all lighting conditions. Bright glare on the water, harsh sun on the ridges, and dim light in the trees all demand different lenses. The new Caravan MAG from Smith fixes lens issues with not only photochrotic lenses but also an easy switching system that takes seconds.

The Caravan has all the standard ChromaPop polarized lenses to choose from but new this year is Smith’s Photochromic option which turns clear to gray as the light changes. The 85% visible light transmission on the clear end lets you see at night or during dark dusk riding. And the 20% light transmission on the dark gray tackles the brightest days. The second set of pink ChromaPop Ignitor lenses cuts glare in low-light conditions.

Smith sells extra ChromaPop lenses in green, bronze, green, pink, and clear if you need the perfect lens for glare on the water or the snow. Switching lenses with the MAG system just involves popping a lever on the arm held in place by magnets and gently pulling apart the frame. No more feeling like you’re going to tear your sunglasses apart to change the lenses.

Julbo Explorer 2.0

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For days with extreme glare on the water or in the mountains, the Explorer 2.0 from Julbo has you covered, literally. A new take on the classic glacier goggles, the Explorer 2.0 has removable side shields to keep the glare out.

Two types of lenses are available to keep the harsh mountain light out. The Reactiv Performance lenses quickly switch from 7% to 35% light transmission, quickly going from shade to bright sun. Meanwhile, the Reactive High Mountain lenses are your friend on the bright snowfields. Their polarized and photochromic lenses only allow 5% to 20% of light in. When it’s 0 degrees on the mountain, the lenses are still able to change according to the light.

Knockaround Fast Lanes Sport

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When your glasses don’t last longer than a summer, it’s time to get something you can knock around and not worry about. The Knockaround Fast Lanes Sport have polarized mirrored lenses and comes in a ton of crazy colors. If you can’t find the brightness you’re looking for, you can mix and match custom designs of the arms, front, and lenses for only a few bucks more and get exactly what you want.

The Sport frames are lightweight and won’t get in your way running or crashing around on the water. The rubberized nose keeps them stuck to your face so they don’t go in the drink. If they do end up sinking to the bottom of the lake, they don’t cost a fortune to replace.

Article One x Ciele GTGlass

Article One x Ciele GTGlass
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Article One aims to make what it calls heirloom eyewear, or glasses you’ll have for the rest of your life. Its frames are handmade in a small village at the base of the Dolomite Mountains in Northern Italy. But its latest collaboration Ciele Athletics was born on a hot day in Las Vegas. With both brands focused on a timeless style and the golden years of athletics in the 70s and 80s, the GTGlass was born.

Incredibly lightweight TR90 polymer plastic frames hold Divel, Italian-made polarized lenses with an extra reflective coating on the back to reduce glare. Includes a hard case and retainer strap.

Oakley Men’s Jupiter Squared Sport Sunglasses

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Oakley premium sunglasses, goggles, prescription eyewear, and accessories are great for athletes. The Jupiter Squared sunglasses are made of plastic but feature Unobtanium frame for better grip when you sweat.

Nike Trainer

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Nike knows a thing or two about sports. The brand’s Trainer sunglasses are solid options for anything sport you do outside: Baseball, basketball, training, or running. The Trainer curves around your face with the 8-base frame. MAX Optics lenses are designed to be clear no matter what angle the ball comes at you. A self-adjusting nose bridge stays in place no matter what the sweat situation. High tension hinges are going to take any abuse that sports, and gear bags, can dish out.

Mike Richard
Mike Richard has traveled the world since 2008. He's kayaked in Antarctica, tracked endangered African wild dogs in South…
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