The Best Fixed Blade Knives for Camping, Carving, and Cutting in General

At first blush, you might think of the term fixed bladed knife as a retronym. Didn’t all knives have a fixed blade, meaning with the blade set firmly into the handle and without a folding capability, up until recent times? Well, no. Not by a long shot. Victorinox made the pocket knife world famous when it released the vaunted Swiss Army Knife back in 1891, but in fact, folding knives date back more than 2,000 years with numerous examples found with ancient Roman origins, some possibly predating the common era by centuries.

While folding blades are convenient, they will never match the durability and ease of a good fixed blade knife. And if you get a great fixed blade knife, you’ll have it for life. Just learn how to hone and sharpen that thing carefully, and keep it clean.

Great full tang fixed bladed knives — full tang means the blade continues throughout the grip, adding strength and durability — come in a vast variety of shapes and sizes and they are designed for myriad uses. There are hunting knives, built to help carve up a fresh kill in the field; utility knives, designed to help with work; and fixed blade knives ideal for camping, mountaineering, or survival situations.

We’re focusing on the best fixed blade knives that sit near the intersection of utility and survival. Any of these knives would be a welcome companion were you to find yourself lost in the woods; needing to cut up some cordage to help build a shelter, gut a fish, shave some kindling; or fight off a mountain lion. Bring one along whenever you camp, trek, or push for the summit, because a solid knife is useful at all times, and is precious when you’re in dire straights.

Ka-Bar U.S. Marine Corps Fighting Knife

Ka-Bar

The Ka-Bar U.S. Marine Corps Fighting Knife is a true classic that has proved its mettle time and time again. Its large blade and sharp point make it a great hunting knife, while its durability makes it a solid blade for working with wood, too. The 7-inch blade and overall length of nearly a foot make this a bigger knife than most people need, but if you ever did find yourself engaged in a self-defense situation, you’d be glad this was the fixed blade that came to hand.

Morakniv Garberg

Morakniv Garberg

I own three Morakniv knives, two of which I acquired directly, one that came as part of a pre-stocked survival/bugout bag. If this is the blade a group of survival experts settled on when they were assembling their kit, I think it’s safe for you to consider it as a knife you use when camping out. The Garberg has a handle contoured perfectly for a steady grip even when your hand is wet with rain or sweat. Keep one in your pack for use in the wild or in your glove compartment for use any time.

James Brand Hell Gap

the james brand hell gap fixed blade knife 4
The James Brand

The Hell Gap knife from The James Brand is a fantastically lightweight knife that has a fantastically sharp blade. It’s made out Crucible s35vn stainless steel, which allows for excellent edge retention and corrosion resistance, making this a good knife to bring along on long treks. That 3.1-ounce weight is also welcome when you’re putting in the miles with a pack on your back.

Gerber Bear Grylls Ultimate Knife

Gerber Bear Grylls Ultimate Knife

The Gerber Bear Grylls Ultimate Knife is a true survival tool designed by the famed survival expert himself. It has a large serrated section for sawing, it comes with a fire-starting Ferrocerium rod tucked into the sheath, and there’s an included sharpener. The relatively short section of non-serrated edge does reduce its usefulness for certain activities, like cooking in the field, but that’s a sacrifice that’s worth it for versatility.

Ontario Knife Company Spec Plus SP-1 Combat Knife

Ontario Knife Company Spec Plus SP-1 Combat Knife

While this Ontario Knife Company blade may have been designed for fighting, I generally avoid combat. However, I’ve spent a lot of time with this knife; I have had my trusty Spec Plus SP-1 strapped to my leg as I pushed for multiple mountain summits and I brought it along during a 10-day trek through the mountains of Colombia. It’s a big knife with a solid grip and a carbon steel blade that keeps an edge well and re-sharpens easily.

SOG SEAL Team Elite

SOG SEAL Team Elite

You don’t have to be a Navy SEAL to use the SEAL Team Elite, but if, like a SEAL, you spend a lot of time in and around water, this is a good knife to choose. It’s highly resistant to corrosion and the handle is designed for a secure grip even with wet hands or under water. The blade is partially serrated and there is a sawtooth edge opposite the cutting edge.

COAST F402

COAST F402

The Coast F402 has a relatively short 4-inch blade considering the knife measures 9 inches in overall length, but that oversized handle allows for a rock-solid grip and precision control. Which is a good thing, because Coast makes crazy sharp knives. The large handle also means that there is more of the blade tucked into the grip that is even exposed (talk about full tang), meaning the balance is superb.

Uncle Henry Golden Spike Knife

Uncle Henry Golden Spike Knife

If you want some classic outdoorsy style along with the sharpness, the Uncle Henry Golden Spike knife is a great choice. It features an imitation bone Staglon handle, a gently curved blade, and a leather sheath complete with a sharpening stone. This isn’t an expensive knife, but it’s decently well made. The blade dulls faster than most others on the list, but it sharpens quickly, too.

If you’re looking for a knife but none of these meet your specifications, check out our picks for the best pocket knives, survival knives, multi-tools, and hatchets.

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