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This is the major change coming to Toblerone chocolate

Stripped of its "Swissness," Toblerone is getting a new look

Toblerone, the nougaty, triangular chocolate bar we all know and love, will be getting a modern makeover later this year. US owner of the popular candy bar company, Mondelez International, has decided to relocate some of Toblerone’s production a few countries over to Slovakia, stripping the chocolate of its “Swissness.”

Under Swiss law, established in 2017, a product that’s advertised with marks such as the Swiss flag, any references to Swiss cities, or, in the case of Toblerone, the Matterhorn mountain, must meet very strict origin criteria. The Swiss powers that be established this law to protect the prestige and reputation of genuine, high-quality Swiss-made products, including, of course, its chocolate.

Toblerone/Facebook

While much of Toblerone’s production will remain in Switzerland — even amping up by the end of the year — the strict laws dictate that it can’t be considered a Swiss product anymore unless manufactured there exclusively.

Because the candy will now be partially produced elsewhere, it will no longer be allowed to advertise with any “Swissness,” including the iconic Matterhorn logo. The label will also shift from reading “Swiss chocolate” to “Established in Switzerland in 1908” instead.

Reportedly, the hidden bear in the current mountainscape design will remain, but no word yet as to how prevalent it will be.

In a statement reported by CNBC, Mondelez International says that the Toblerone new logo will have a “modernized and streamlined mountain logo that is consistent with the geometric and triangular aesthetic.”

We think we speak for most when we say we couldn’t care less what the box looks like. Just make sure it tastes the same.

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Lindsay Parrill
Lindsay is a graduate of California Culinary Academy, Le Cordon Bleu, San Francisco, from where she holds a degree in…
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