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This Guinness braised short ribs recipe is the ultimate comfort food

The incredible stout makes these short ribs shine in all the right ways

On a cold, rainy day, is there anything more comforting than short ribs? Well, yes, actually. Short ribs that have been slowly, lovingly braised in Guinness. Yes, this rich stout delivers yet again with its smooth, bold flavor bringing out the meaty succulence of fall-of-the-bone short ribs.

Guinness really is the gift of flavor that keeps on giving. We’ve all enjoyed its hoppy smoothness in a tall, chilled pint glass. We’ve even seen it shine alongside chocolate in our new favorite cupcake recipe. But now, we’ve seen its magic spread right on through to a meaty, savory, stick-to-your-ribs, wonderful fall comfort food.

While the ribs in this recipe are incredibly tender and flavorful, the gorgeously savory sauce shines on its own, highlighting the meaty rich flavor of the ribs. With its hoppy notes flowing throughout the flavorful sauce this recipe creates, an otherwise typical gravy is elevated to something truly spectacular. The sauce is so good you might want to pour it in a pint glass. Or at least over mashed potatoes, which make a perfect pairing.

Guinness braised short ribs recipe

Image used with permission by copyright holder

(From Jo Cooks)

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 4 pounds beef short ribs
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 large carrot, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 440 ml Guinness stout (1 can)
  • 2 cups beef broth
  • 1 tablespoon liquid smoke
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 375F.
  2. On a shallow plate, whisk together flour, salt, and pepper. Dredge the short ribs through the flour mixture, coating evenly and thoroughly.
  3. In a large Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add ribs in small batches, being careful not to overcrowd them. Sear on all sides until browned. Repeat with remaining ribs. Remove the ribs from the pot and set aside.
  4. To the same pot add onions, carrot, celery, garlic and saute until the vegetables are softened.
  5. Add in tomato paste, Guinness, beef broth, liquid smoke, rosemary, and thyme, and bring to a boil. Season with salt and pepper, if needed.
  6. Add short ribs back to the pot and cover with a lid.
  7. Place the pot in the oven and cook for 2 1/2 – 3 hours, until the ribs fall off the bone.
  8. Remove the rosemary and thyme from the pot, then garnish with parsley. Serve with mashed potatoes.

So dish yourself up a big bowl, paired (obviously) with a cold Guinness, prop your feet up on the couch, and settle in for the epitome of comfort food.

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Lindsay Parrill
Lindsay is a graduate of California Culinary Academy, Le Cordon Bleu, San Francisco, from where she holds a degree in…
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