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The Best Drinking Card Games for Parties

Stuck at home? Why not engage in an All-American pastime: Drinking card games? After all, everyone loves a good drinking game. It livens up parties, creates tons of hilarious memories, and makes drinking at home much less boring. We all probably played our fair share of drinking games at college parties — classics like King’s Cup or random games where the group made up the rules and challenges just for a bit of fun, with many of the most popular games doubling as card games, because who didn’t have a deck of cards hanging around their dorm? With our normal out-of-the-house activities and hobbies temporarily on hold, maybe now is the time to revisit those classics for a break from the monotony or to give a new game a try. With a bit of ingenuity, some of these games could even be played virtually (like designating a dealer in each house to make sure all the cards line up and are the same). Whether playing on Zoom or with your friends and roommates that you’re sheltering in place with, these are the best drinking card games to try!

Best Drinking Card Games for Parties
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Kings

Is there any better drinking game than Kings or King’s Cup? This popular game was a mainstay of college parties, especially with large groups, and always makes for a fun and entertaining time, but if it’s been a while since you played, here’s a refresher. To play, you’ll need a deck of cards, a cup, and your booze of choice. The players sit in a circle with the cup in the middle, taking turns picking a card from a shuffled pack. Each card has a designated action the player(s) must complete. Here’s the rundown of the actions for each card (note that there are usually more than one option for what the cards signify, so you may be used to a slightly different version):

  • Ace = Waterfalls. Starting with the person who drew the card, everyone starts drinking as the person to their left starting drinking, creating a “waterfall” effect around the table, and they can’t stop until the person on the left stops. 
  • Two = You. The person who drew the card chooses someone else to drink. 
  • Three = Me. The person who drew the card drinks. 
  • Four = Floor. Everyone touches the floor; the last person to not touch the floor has to drink. 
  • Five = Guys. All the guys in the circle drink. 
  • Six = Chicks. All the women drink. 
  • Seven = Heaven. Everyone points upward toward the ceiling (heaven) and the person who does it last has to drink. 
  • Eight = Mate. Choose a drinking buddy; that person now has to drink every time you do, and you have to drink when they do. This lasts until either one of you draws eight again and chooses a new drinking buddy. 
  • Nine = Rhyme. The person who drew the card says a word and the person to their left has to come up with a word that rhymes. This continues around the circle until someone can’t find a rhyme and drinks. 
  • Ten = Categories. Pick a category of things and starting with the person to your left, that person has to think of something in that category. This continues around the circle until someone can’t think of something in that category or the options have been exhausted; that person draws. 
  • Jack = Never Have I Ever. All the players put up three fingers and, starting with the card drawer, name things they haven’t done, putting down fingers for things they have done. The first person out of fingers drinks. 
  • Queen = Question Master. Whoever draws the Queen is the question master until someone else draws a queen. During their tenure as the question master, they can ask anyone a question anytime throughout the game. That person has to respond or will have to drink. 
  • King = Make a Rule. The card drawer makes a rule that everyone follows; anyone who doesn’t follow the rule has to drink. 

Beeramid

With simple, direct gameplay and few rules, Beeramid makes for a fun, uncomplicated drinking game that anyone can learn or do.  On a tabletop, the dealer lays out shuffled cards in the shape of a pyramid, starting with seven on the bottom row (or as many as you want, really), six above that, and so on until reaching one. All the remaining cards are distributed to the players in even numbers so that everyone has the same amount. For ten seconds, all the players look at their cards and memorize them (or try to), and then put their cards down. 

The dealer then turns over the first card on the bottom row, and anyone who claims to have that card challenges another player to drink. That player has the option to either drink or call the original challenger’s bluff, as the challenger could be lying that they have the same card as the one that was turned over. If the person who is told to drink calls bluff, the challenger needs to reveal the card; if they don’t have it and lied, they drink twice, but if they did, the person who called their bluff drinks twice. 

F*ck the Dealer 

If you have an interest in gambling, this is a fun one as it’s all about guessing based on your knowledge of the card deck. To start with, all the players are dealt a card from a shuffled pack, and the player with the lowest card is the dealer, who re-collects the cards and reshuffles. They then ask the person to their left to guess the card at the top of the deck. If the guess is right, the dealer has to drink four times (as in, take four sips). If the guess is wrong, the dealer gives the player another chance, giving them a clue by saying the card is higher or lower than what they guessed. If the second guess is still incorrect, that player has to drink the number of differences between the guess and the card. If the second guess is correct, the turn moves to the next player. The dealer is only able to get out of their duties in the event that three players in a row can’t guess the cards correctly on either their first or second guesses, and the person to the left of the dealer takes over. The game continues until the deck is gone. 

Bullsh*t

Another staple of college parties, this classic card game has been around forever and is always a hoot to play: All you need is a standard card deck and a fair-sized group of people. With the object of the game being to be the first to get rid of all your cards, all the players sit in a circle and are dealt an equal number of cards each. Starting with the person to the left of the dealer, the game starts with Aces, and the starting player puts down one or more Ace face down and says how many Aces they’re putting down. 

But this is where the bullsh*tting comes in: If the player doesn’t have the card they’re supposed to play, they still have to play a card but lie, saying that that card is, say, an Ace. The key is to be as believable as possible so someone doesn’t doubt your play. If someone does doubt the play, they call “Bullsh*t” and check the card; if the person who called bull is right, the player has to have the number of drinks as the cards they put down (one card, one drink, and so on) and they get the cards back, thus no losing any cards. But if the person who called bull is wrong, they take as many drinks as there are cards and they get the cards. Gameplay continues from Aces through twos, threes, and so on until a King is played and it starts over with Aces. 

Across The Bridge

If you’re looking for a simple, no-fuss card game to play that doesn’t involve a lot of rules or set-up and gets straight to the drinking, Across The Bridge is a great option. Ten cards from a shuffled pack are placed face down next to each other in a row, with the objective being that players will move across the row by flipping over cards. If the overturned card is a numbered card, the player can turn over another one. But if the overturned card has a face, the player has to take a drink, remove that card from the lineup, and add more cards to the end of the bridge, making the line longer. Depending on the type of face card, there are different numbers of cards that need to be added: A Jack is one card, a Queen is two, a King is three, and an Ace is four. The turn then passes clockwise and the game proceeds until a player reaches the final card, and all the other players drink. 

Cards Against Humanity Drinking Game

Cards Against Humanity Drinking Game

While not originally designed with drinking in mind, Cards Against Humanity was arguably the best new card game of the 2010s and became an instant classic. So naturally, a CAH drinking game had to come along. Following traditional CAH gameplay, there is the role of Card Czar who draws a black card with a fill-in-the-blank statement and all the other players have to select a white card (which has different items, people, places, or concepts on them) that they feel best fits the black card’s statement. The Card Czar picks the white card they think fits best and give the black card to the person who played the winning white card, allowing them to accumulate black cards toward winning; the role of Card Czar can then rotate to a different player. 

To incorporate the drinking game, the Card Czar will actually select white cards for first, second, and third place, and the players who played those cards have to drink according to what place they got (one shot for first place, chugging half a can of beer for second place, and a quarter of a can of beer for third). There are many other add-on rules you can find online, but this simple addition keeps all the fun of CAH without overcomplicating things. Plus, CAH goes fast so there will be plenty of drinking to be done. 

Sotally Tober

Sotally Tober

This card game was specifically designed with drinking in mind. There are 125 cards, divided between five different categories: Activity, Skill, Curse, Secret, and Decree (each category has a different color as well to distinguish them). The Activities card lists an action or activity you have to perform, like having a staring contest with another player and the first one to blink drinks. Skills give you a power or ability that you can use over the other players, like saying that whoever is using their phone has to drink. Curse is a challenge that will make the game more difficult, like having to go two rounds with one eye closed, and if you mess up, you drink. Secret is cards with secret instructions that you can give to different players; the secret message could be something like “Bail me out!” if there is an instruction you don’t want to do. Decree cards give the player who drew the card the ability to make a decree that applies to everyone, like having to drink with pinkies out, and whoever forgets or doesn’t do it has to drink. Each player takes a turn, and at the end of the game, whoever has had the least amount of drinks is the winner. 

Buzzed

Buzzed

This drinking card game is definitely for adults and those with a lewd sense of humor; it’s quite NSFW, so makes for a ton of fun at adults-only parties. There are 180 cards, each with prompts and questions that either just the specific player or everyone has to follow. Each player takes a turn drawing a card from the top of the pack, reading out the query on the back of it, and then either they or everyone has to drink if the question applies to them. For example, if you ever “studied abroad in Europe and it totally changed your life” or “if you think pineapple is an acceptable topping for pizza,” you drink. There are tons of fun questions, and as the game (and drinking) progresses, there are bound to be plenty of funny, revelatory moments. 

Under The Influence

Under The Influence

Another card game designed with drinking in mind, Under The Influence’s card prompts are guaranteed to ensure some wild times. The 200 cards are divided into four categories: Who’s Who, Under The Influence, Shots No Chaser, and Brain Benders. Each category has different questions, challenges, prompts, or instructions that the player(s) have to follow; they can be as tame as a truth or dare question or something more risque like daring a player to take off an article of clothing (if they don’t, they have to drink). Depending on the vibe of the party, you can remove the more extreme challenges, but if you’re really looking for a crazy time that you’ll remember (hazily), leave them in.

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