Skip to main content

The Manual may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site.

The 7 Best Beers for People Who Don’t Like Beer

Moody Tongue Beers
Image used with permission by copyright holder

The advent of hard seltzers has not helped craft beer lovers convince their friends who say they don’t like beer that there’s still some real beer out there they’ll enjoy. That’s why most big name domestic breweries have taken the “If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em” approach and produced their own fruity, spicy water.

Yet those who champion beer should not stop fighting the good fight. For plenty of people, beer still means the watery industrial lagers so many of us guzzled down in college. For those who don’t like beer in the classic American commoditized sense, a citrusy IPA, a coffee-like stout, or a nutty brown ale is all it takes for an ah-ha! moment. There are plenty out there, however, who find even those beers too unpalatable and have sworn off beer forever.

Related Reading:

BUT! That’s the beauty of how far craft beer has come, so much so that the nerdiest of beer nerds have turned to beers like hazy IPAs that look and often taste almost like orange juice and pastry stouts that taste like pie. Breweries are even harnessing the power of hops to alter the flavor of IPAs to barely taste like beer. Then there are the milkshake IPAs that use lactose for an enhanced mouthfeel.

There’s a whole world of beer that doesn’t taste remotely like beer to help convince those who’ve sworn off the brewed beverage for good that there is, in fact, a beer for them.

For your convenience, here are some of the best beers that don’t taste like beer. We’ve also tried to include beers that are at least available regionally, but to be sure, there are plenty of awesome local brewers experimenting with beers and making them taste like they’re not, well, beer.

UFO Georgia Peach

UFO Georgia Peach
Image used with permission by copyright holder

If you hate beer so much you can’t stand to think you’ll ever taste it,

UFO Georgia Peach

is the brew for you — especially if you’re a peach lover.

The brewery, spun off from Boston-based Harpoon, promises “right-off-the-peach-tree” flavor, and it essentially tastes like a bite into a ripe peach. While it’s a hefeweizen base, none of the classic hefeweizen flavors — such as banana or clove — shine through, leaving a refreshing, peachy drink. Not a peach fan? That’s OK, there’s a whole line of other UFO beers that come in variety packs, including pineapple, mango limeade, watermelon lemonade, and blood orange lemonade.

Sixpoint Jammers

Sixpoint Jammers
Image used with permission by copyright holder

When talking to beer novices, a word we often steer away from is sour, but they can be some of the best beers to introduce a hater to the category. Specifically for our “beers that don’t taste like beer” theme, take a look at

Sixpoint’s

Jammer series. The base beer, Jammer, is a gose, a lightly soured beer originating from northern Germany that is reminiscent of lemonade. Sixpoint expands this beer with plenty of real fruit juice flavorings, and the “Jammer Pack” includes Citrus Jammer, Ruby Jammer, Tropical Jammer, and Berry Jammer.

Learn More

Elysian Brewing Raspy Whisper

Image used with permission by copyright holder

Washington-based

Elysian Brewing

is plenty experimental with its beers, once making a pumpkin peach beer — famous for a Budweiser ad that made fun of pumpkin peach beers shortly before Bud’s parent acquired the brand (because who doesn’t like a good pint of irony). Elysian hasn’t strayed from its ways and is making Raspy Whisper, a raspberry and chocolate gose. Each barrel of the beer has 20 pounds of raspberries and five pounds of cocoa nibs. Clocking in 3.6% alcohol by volume, this fruity, sweet, and tangy beer has plenty going for it.

Learn More

Schlafly Raspberry Hefeweizen

Elysian Brewing Raspy Whisper
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Staying true to the raspberry theme as it’s a powerful and often refreshing flavor, is St. Louis-based

Schlafly’s

Raspberry Hefeweizen. Schlafly uses plenty of real raspberries during the fermentation process to ensure plenty of bright fruit flavors and a nice pink color. Like a fresh raspberry in the summer, the hefeweizen is clean and tart, yet refreshing.

Learn More

Moody Tongue Beers

Moody Tongue Beers
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Moody Tongue

is a Chicago-based brewery that’s small but pretty widely distributed. The brewery was started by Jared Rouben, a chef-turned brewer who brought his culinary mindset to the beer world. His beers include Peeled Grapefruit Pilsner, Caramelized Chocolate Churro Baltic Porter, and Steeped Emperor’s Lemon Saison — all of which are more reminiscent of their foodie namesakes than beer.

Learn More

Prairie Artisan Ales Prairie Bomb!

Prairie Artisan Ales

This might be a stretch, but why not try to go big?

Prairie Artisan Ales’

 Prairie Bomb! Clocks in at a massive 13% ABV, so it’s not gonna drink like a beer. Beer lovers rave about this beer, but so long as one has an adventurous palate, so will non-beer-lovers. It also has loads of chocolate, vanilla beans, coffee, and chili peppers, so there’s plenty of flavor going on to keep a picky drinker from proclaiming, “This tastes like beer!”

Learn More

Short’s Soft Parade

Image used with permission by copyright holder

Short’s Brewery

is well known in Michigan for its eclectic beers with distinct flavors. The Soft Parade fruit ale is one of Short’s five flagship beers that have made it out of Michigan to other states. They brew it with pureed strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries. It sounds like the makings of a wine cooler, but fruitiness doesn’t overwhelm the beer’s overall balance. Its low IBA content gives it a dry and smooth finish, making this beer an excellent choice to try and convert your anti-beer buddies. Be careful, though. Its drinkability combined with its high ABV (7.5%) will sneak up on you.

Learn More

Editors' Recommendations

Steven Johnson
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Steven Johnson is a chef-turned-content strategist. He now helps companies attract and retain more customers through content…
The best orange wines for something satisfyingly in between a red and white
Orange wine to try
orange wine

Orange wine continues to dazzle wine drinkers, and it's no wonder that the style sits in a happy medium between whites and reds. The style, a skin-fermented white wine hailing from the Republic of Georgia, is one of the oldest around. And it's also never been more popular, with imports continuing to pour in and domestic producers trying their own takes on orange wine, utilizing a broad range of interesting grape varieties.

Simply put, now's an ideal time to enjoy orange wine. They're coming in from all corners of the global wine map and taking advantage of everything from Gewurztraminer to Marsanne. Most exciting, the best orange wines afford the structure of red wine and the sprightliness of white wine. Like an oxidized Rosé with tannin and sometimes funky and intriguing flavors profiles, these wines are captivating.

Read more
A beginner’s guide to Burmese cuisine
Plus, a recipe to make the national dish
Tofu dish from Top Burmese in Portland, Oregon

When it comes to Asian cuisine, there are several heavyweights. Chinese, Japanese cuisine, and Thai jump to mind, three major cooking styles that have crossed many oceans and created solid footings abroad. But what of the smaller nations and their unique culinary customs?
Burma is one of those Asian countries, roughly the size of Texas and wedged between Bangladesh to the west and Thailand and Laos to the east. It’s important to note that the nation also goes by the Myanmar name, depending on who you ask. Political turmoil over the last several decades has seen not only a tug-of-war regarding its national title but also a struggle to define itself. Generations of British colonialism faded into brutal military rule and several uprisings.
This is the land of large pythons and precious stones. Some 90% of the globe’s rubies come from Burma. Rice is Burma’s biggest export and the landscape is dramatic, with towering mountain ranges, verdant jungles, and incredible old towers from bygone civilizations. Some 100 ethnic groups call Burma home, making the population of more than 53 million extremely diverse.
With tons of coastline, thanks to the adjacent Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, Burma cuisine is unsurprisingly driven by seafood. This is the land of fish sauce and dried prawns. The national dish is mohinga, a breakfast dish made with rice noodles and fish soup. Inland, there's more in the way of pork and beef and plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables. 

Local Burmese restaurant in the U.S.

Read more
How to build the perfect charcuterie board for your date night
Check out these charcuterie board ideas to top off your evening
Charcuterie board and glasses of wine on a wooden table

The art of the charcuterie board goes far beyond the fancy ones you’ve seen on your screen. These Instagram-worthy adult Lunchables have ancient origins and meticulous methods that make them an even more appealing option for your dinner party. From the authentic to the adventurous, here’s how to take a pedestrian cheese plate and turn it into sensational charcuterie.
How to make a charcuterie board

Charcuterie boards should offer an array of flavors and textures that offer contrasting and complementing tastes in each bite. How the board elements are displayed is quintessential to its allure, but there are no specific rules to follow. Be as whimsical as you wish, playing with colors and layers, adding as much or as little as you think your guests will enjoy.

Read more