7 Frank Lloyd Wright-Designed Homes that You Can Rent for Your Next Vacation

It seems we just can’t get enough of America’s most beloved architect. In recent years, homes designed by Frank Lloyd Wright have been hitting the market and selling lightning-fast as people scramble to claim a piece of history. Think the high price tags of these homes means you’ll never get a chance to stay in one? Think again. Several Wright-designed homes are open to the public — not just for daily tours, but to rent out for overnight stays. Here’s our roundup of seven Frank Lloyd Wright creations you can call home for the night.

Bernard Schwartz House – Still Bend

bernard schwartz house still bend
Still Bend House/Facebook

This “dream house” was designed by Wright through a commission by Life Magazine and The Architectural Forum. Located in Wisconsin and named Still Bend by Wright, it was one of the projects he was most proud off, yet is often overshadowed by Falling Water. Now, the Schwartz House is being cared for by the Ditmer brothers and you can rent it out for a chance to experience what Wright called “a little private club.”

Emil Bach House

Emil Bach House
Emil Bach House

His iconic prairie-style home was what Wright built his career on and Emil Bach House, located in Chicago, is a shining example. Built in 1915, the home has been lovingly restored to its original glory and the architect’s signature style can be found around every corner. From built-in seating to leaded glass windows, Bach House easily earned its spot on the National Register of Historic Places.

Eppstein House

Eppstein House
Eppstein House/Airbnb

With concrete block walls, red concrete floors, and a massive fireplace anchoring the public spaces, Eppstein House proudly shows off its unique Usonian Automatic style. While years of neglect forced a modern renovation of the Eppstein House, which is located in Michigan, the owners were careful to preserve as much original detail as possible. Modern comforts meet classic style making for an unforgettable stay.

Louis Penfield House

Louis Penfield House
The Louis Penfield House/Facebook

Built in 1955 and overlooking the Chagrin River in Ohio, Penfield House is an outlier for Wright. Known for his low ceilings which created a feeling of intimacy, the famed architect had to approach this project a bit differently. With a client who stood at 6’8” tall, Wright was forced to rethink ceiling heights and in turn designed a home that is truly unique among all of his creations.

Seth Peterson Cottage

Seth Peterson Cottage
Seth Peterson Cottage

Creating tiny houses before it was trendy, Wright designed the Peterson Cottage near the end of his career. Located in Wright’s home state of Wisconsin, the cottage features high ceilings with tall windows, filling the small space with natural light. Thanks to the love and care of the Seth Peterson Cottage Conservancy, the tiny home has hosted over 10,000 guests in the last two decades.

Cornwell House

Cornwell House
Cornwell House

If you’re heading to Hawaii for your next vacation, check an item off your Wright bucket list by staying in the only one of his designs to be built in the Aloha state. Constructed in 1995, the Cornwell House was originally designed, but never built, for a Pennsylvania family. This is the case for many of the prolific architect’s designs. Now, in conjunction with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and Taliesin Associated Architects, several of his plans have been posthumously realized, including Cornwell House.

Dr. Richard Davis House Woodside

Dr. Richard Davis House Woodside
Dr. Richard Davis House Woodside

How do you repay your doctor for performing a successful surgery? Well if you were Frank Lloyd Wright, you would design a house for him. That’s how the Dr. Richard Davis House, located in Indiana, came to be. Named Woodside by Wright, this Usonian-style home stands out for it’s dramatic, teepee-like roof. It’s a strong departure from the architect’s typical low profile roof lines and making a stay here an exciting experience for fans of America’s most beloved architect.

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