Is This the Best Pot Roast Recipe Ever?

One thing that is oft-overlooked during the summer is the slow cooking method. Hear us out.

There’s no denying that grilling is the preferred method of cooking during the summer months. You’re outside, with an open flame, making delicious meals. Amazing. But, you’re still cooking, being an active person. What if all you want to do is spend all day outside, getting blasted on beers? You could while you’re grilling, but it isn’t recommended (that whole “fire hurts if you touch it” thing).

Instead, you can make a meal in the afternoon (when you’re taking a lunch and bathroom break from whatever you’re doing), then let it cook slowly and quietly inside so that when you’re finally ready to eat, the food is ready and you had to do basically jack all day long. Yeah, it’ll be hot inside, but you won’t be there, so what does it really matter?

When it comes to slow cooking recipes, there’s almost nothing better than pot roast. The Manual’s best pot roast recipe is one that you can put together quickly (prep time is under 20 minutes) and it’ll be cooked by the time you need to fill up on meat and carbs before passing out.

The ability to layer flavors is what makes this roast such an amazing one-pot meal. Take your time in the initial stages, don’t rush any of the first few steps, and you’ll be amazed by the savory, yet nuanced, result.

For this recipe, you’ll need an oven-proof pot and lid. We used this set by Ikea, but would also recommend this pricey, but long-lasting and attractive, one by Le Creuset. If you want to adapt the recipe for outside of the oven here are some of the best slow cookers on the market right now.

The Manual’s Best Pot Roast Recipe

pot roast on a plate

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 lbs chuck roast
  • 4-6 yellow potatoes, quartered, skins-on
  • 3-4 medium-sized carrots, chopped
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 large white onion, chopped
  • 1 sprig of rosemary
  • 1 sprig of thyme
  • 1 carton beef broth
  • 1/4 cup red wine
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbsp white flour
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Olive oil

Method:

  1. Heat oven to 340 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Place the pot on medium-high heat directly on the stove top. Coat the bottom of the pot with olive oil and sear your already salted and peppered chuck roast until all sides are nicely browned (there will be oil splatter). Remove chuck roast from pot and set aside.
  3. Lower the heat to just above medium and add chopped onions. Allow the onions to soften, approximately 3-5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt and pepper.
  4. Add the chopped carrots and cook for another 3 minutes. Add a smaller pinch of salt and pepper. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute.
  5. Add Worcestershire sauce, stirring in quickly and slightly deglazing the pan, then add tomato paste and mix thoroughly. Cook the paste just long enough to remove any raw tomato flavor, about 2 minutes.
  6. Add the red wine and fully de-glaze the bottom of the pan using a wooden spoon. If the sides are covered in browned bits, scrap those too — they’re full of flavor. Simmer wine and vegetables together until slightly thick.
  7. Add the flour and stir thoroughly, cooking approximately 1 minute to eliminate any raw flour taste. Pour a little bit of beef broth into the pot and stir well. At this point you want a thick mixture in the bottom of the pan to place your chuck roast on. Add another pinch of salt and pepper.
  8. Place chuck roast back in the pan and add in chopped potatoes.
  9. Fill the rest of the pan with beef broth until the liquid level is just below the surface of the roast. Add sprigs of thyme and rosemary.
  10. Place lid on the pot and put in the oven to cook for roughly 2 hours, stirring occasionally or topping off the beef broth if too much has evaporated off.
  11. Once the roast is finished, remove the pot from oven (carefully!) and place back on the stove. Serve with a crust of bread and enjoy!

Leftover pot roast can last up to a week in the refrigerator and, like most one-pot meals, the flavor only gets stronger after the second day.

Article originally published by Chase McPeak on October 11, 2016. Last updated by Sam Slaughter on July 25, 2018.

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