Skip to main content

The Manual may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site.

Snow Peak is Japan’s One-Stop-Shop for Outdoor Gear (and You Can Get it in the U.S.)

snowpeak
Image used with permission by copyright holder
In 1958, accomplished mountaineer, Yukio Yamai, was disenchanted with the existing line of climbing gear on the market. This was the catalyst that launched Snow Peak, a company that began its journey in Sanjo City, in the Chūetsu region of Niigata Prefecture. The town was known for its history of fine crafted metal work. It was here that Yamai created his own line of superior climbing gear.

Yamai was inspired by this region that is surrounded by a high mountain range, deep valleys, and rivers that empty into the Sea of Japan. It is here that the company was born and where the designers continue to be inspired. The company’s international headquarters are still located in that same area and remains deeply connected to the outdoors and to insuring that nature is a part of life.

In 1980, Yamai’s son, Toru, took over and continues to lead the company. Under his leadership, the brand has attained worldwide recognition for its superior design and simplicity and has and continues to achieve the company’s mission to bring all people closer to nature.

Over fifty years after the company’s inception, Yukio’s granddaughter, Lisa Yamai, launched Snow Peak Apparel in 2014. The apparel division’s goal is to produce ultra-technical garments built for the outdoors but that also transition easily between urban and trail. The collection is divided into three categories: Transit, Camp, and Dwell. Check out some of our picks from Snow Peak’s incredible stock below.

Get The Gear

Flexible Insulated Shirt – $240

snowpeak insulated jacket
Image used with permission by copyright holder

This versatile, insulated shirt features a windproof outer layer. Front snap buttons make this shirt both functional and fashionable and sure to become a wardrobe staple.

Titanium Double 600 Mug – $60

snowpeak titanium mug
Image used with permission by copyright holder

This simplistic yet nearly indestructible camp mug is made of corrosion-resistant, lightweight titanium and double-wall construction, so it’s insulated as hell. This 20 ounce capacity mug weighs just over 5 ounces.

Iron Grill Table – $150+

This customizable gourmet camping solution allows the user to select the preferred size and height to accommodate their personal needs. The IGT allows for personal customization of stove options, work surfaces, and even storage units.

Editor’s Note: This article is part of The Manual’s larger Journey to Japan travel guide. Over the course of a month, our writers had the pleasure of experiencing Japan in its many forms, from high-rise bars in Tokyo to traditional tea-ceremonies in Kyoto. We hope this series of articles will not only inform, but inspire you to take your own trip to the Land of the Rising Sun.

Editors' Recommendations

Clay Abney
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Clay Abney is a PR guru and freelance writer living in the wild and wonderful state of West Virginia, where he spends his…
Protect your skin in style this summer with the best sun shirts of 2024
Better than sunscreen and chemical-free, these tops are purpose-built to fend off those "endless summer" rays.
Man fishing on a boat while wearing an Orvis DriCast sun protection hoodie.

When it comes to dressing for the summer heat, "less is more" seems to make the most sense. Less clothing means less trapped body heat, and that makes for a more comfortable you. For the most part, that works. But this equation doesn't account for protecting your skin against the sun's harmful UV rays.

For outdoorsy types – we’re talking the most adventurous kind, like trail runners, hikers, kayakers, mountain climbers, and so on – wearing less clothing while spending a significant amount of time in the sun can actually do more harm than good. Sure, sunscreen is a thing, and you should definitely keep using it. But that’s also where another problem arises: In order to protect your skin from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays, sunscreen — even the best natural, reef-safe sunscreen — needs to be slathered on regularly. And, if you’re spending more time outdoors than in, that gets expensive, too. That's where good sun-protective shirts (a.k.a. "sun shirts") come in.

Read more
Hiking the trail? Here are 9 tips for safe self-navigation
Plus, how to signal for help if you do get lost
Man hiking with poles near a mountain

You’re miles into the backcountry with only your instincts and your gear to point the way. In the vast wilderness, panic starts to set in. Is it this way? Or is it that way? Getting lost on the trail is easy to do and a quick transition from a tranquil to terrifying experience, especially for solo hikers looking out at an indiscernible landscape. In this case, however, that anxiety doesn’t last because you’ve brought along the correct gear to combat the fear.

Whether it’s mountain biking, trail running, camping, or backcountry skiing, you need to prepare for wild excursions. As always, The Manual has got you covered. Find the right gear here, along with the apps, guidelines, and veteran tips to keep you oriented no matter where your next off-grid journey takes you.
Map out your plan

Read more
How to improve your cycling speed and ride like the wind
Tips to help make you faster on your bicycle
Person riding a bike fast

If there's one thing that cyclists of all levels want to improve upon, it's speed. Whether you want to keep up with a faster group ride, be able to pack more miles into the day, or simply want to cover more ground every time you go out, then it's time to consider how to improve cycling speed. With a few adjustments to your riding style and stance, as well as by adding in some training sessions from time to time, you can pedal faster in no time.
Ride aerodynamically

One of the easiest -- and most immediate -- ways to improve your cycling speed is to ride aerodynamically. To do this, you can start by pulling your arms in closer to your body. Make sure they are not fully extended and that your elbows are not poking out. So, bend your arms and pull the elbows in toward your sides. This will cut down on the amount of wind resistance you are fighting against.

Read more