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The Best Cheap Golf Club Deals For September 2021

Golf clubs in a bag.
If you’re shopping for golf club deals, your timing is perfect. While it’s totally true you can find golf club sales all year, there are certain times of the year when retailers and manufacturers work together to offer customers extra-special golf club deals. If you’re an advanced player you likely know exactly what brand, model, and configurations, and modifications you want. Beginners and even intermediate golfers can get confused and even overwhelmed by the advertising and marketing rhetoric that surrounds golf clubs. We’ve lined up some of the best deals for individual golf clubs and sets of clubs on sale today. The sales change often and we update this post on a regular basis, so if you don’t see what you want today, check back regularly.

Any golfer can benefit from Garmin watch deals for GPS golf watches. Garmin’s Approach model smartwatches have data about courses worldwide and allow you to enter your own data each time you play.

Today’s Best Golf Club Deals

Aluminum clubs with graphite shafts, the Edge set includes a driver, 3-wood, 5 hybrid, 6,7,8,9, irons, pitching wedge, sand wedge, and a putter. more
This complete set of clubs and bag is designed to inspire and build confidence in golfers with select clubs for each task from tee to cup. more
Ttitleist's TS2 Hybrid combines qualities of irons and fairway wood for easy swing and distance. This club is specifically designed as a lightweight, aerodynamic fairway wood. more
Select clubs with a bag and stand all engineered for female golfers include an oversized composite driver, low profile and hybrid fairway woods, and stainless steel irons with graphite shafts. more
Designed for maximum forgiveness, this club is all about compensating for poor swing and ball contact. As long as you can hit the ball, this club is supposed to help you get the best possible results. more
Callaway used artificial intelligence to design the face of this fairway wood. A single weight establishes a low center of gravity for a high launch and flat trajectory. more
This driver has a 460cc head size designed to produce higher launch and longer distance drives. One key benefit is a flex in the club that's between normal and stiff good for different swing speeds. more
TaylorMade shapes and grinds the heads of this golf wedge using input from tour player feedback. The focus is on providing a versatile club for chips, pitches, and other shots in rough placements. more
This driver is all about adding distance to your tee shots with Tommy Armour Inertia Technology that optimizes weight placement in the club for maximum distance without heavy weight. more
The M4 fairway wood has large club head footprint with a low-profile shape for less resistance and maximum distance. Strategic weights placement on the head increases the ball speed after impact. more
This is a complete set of clubs including driver, 3 wood, hybrid fairway woods, irons, wedge, putter, headcovers, and a standing bag. more
This driver is all about custom adjustments to configure the club's head weight to change the center of gravity to correct the ball's flight path. more
Designed for typical teens age eleven to fifteen, the Wilson Juniors set . This set includes a carry bag, driver, hybrid and fairway woods, pitching wedge, sand wedge, 6,7,8,and 9 irons and a putter. more
This set of TaylorMade irons has thin faces for greater speed and a club shape face for optimal accuracy. more

How to Choose a Golf Club

Choosing a single golf club, or a full set of clubs is a much bigger deal than selecting golf balls. One obvious point is golf balls only cost a few dollars each at most, so even if you buy a few dozen balls, you aren’t out a whole lot of money for one thing. Plus, even if you buy golf balls designed for advanced players and you can’t take advantage of the all features, at least you can still play with them. Golf clubs, however, vary in myriad ways. If you spend several hundred dollars on a club that requires a player with a much higher skill level than you currently possess, you’re bound to be frustrated and, frankly, you pretty much wasted your money.

Below we discuss major factors to consider when shopping for golf clubs. If you keep the following in mind, you may not buy a set of clubs that magically transform you to a top player, but you’ll be more likely to choose clubs and match or only slightly exceed your skill level so you can enjoy them while you learn and improve your golf game.

  • Golfer, Know Thyself: The first consideration, before you even start to look for golf club deals, is to decide what you are looking for based on your current skill level, your limitations, and what you want to improve. If you’ve never played golf before, or even if you’ve only played a few times, you needn’t get too concerned about your skill level, just look for a decent golf club sale on a beginner’s set and start playing.
  • Intermediate to Advanced Players: After you’ve played a bit, you’ll have a sense of your strong points as a golfer and those that need the most work. It can help immensely to know your handicap. If you’ve been assigned a handicap by a club or a league all the better, but otherwise you can get a rough idea of your handicap by keeping track of how many shots over par you typically take on an 18-hole course. Official handicap scoring systems account for specific course slope scores and course ratings. The whole point of the handicap system when you’re looking for new clubs, or a single club such as a new driver, fairway woods, or a set of irons, is to have an accurate understanding of your skill level. Do you play at the pro level, at or close to par? Are you an advanced player usually within single digits of reaching par on an 18-hole course? How about 10 to 15 extra strokes, which means you’re a serious intermediate golfer. Or do you average 20 strokes or more over par and still considered in need of major improvement? If you normally score more than 100 on an 18-hole course, don’t worry about handicaps, you’re still a beginner.
  • Match Your Skill Level to the Clubs: Even if you don’t understand much of the nomenclature around golf club design, structure, and components, you’ll find it easy to determine the intended customer for a given club or set. Except for wedges and putters, nearly all club descriptions mention distance, accuracy, and control, but read just a bit deeper to understand the benefits achieved by the choices the manufacturer made for the specific clubs. For example, if a description mentions a clubface designed to maximize “forgiveness,” that means the club is good for people who don’t hit the ball in the best spot of the clubface. Manufacturers often use clubface designs and material patterns to help golfers who don’t always hit the ball perfectly.
  • Recommendations: You won’t likely get the best golf club deals in a golf course pro shop, but if you take a few lessons from a pro it can pay off when you make your next golf club purchase. A teaching golf pro can recommend specific brands or models or types of golf clubs that are best for your skill level and will help you improve in the areas where you need the most work. With all respect to your friends, while most golfers have strong opinions on the best golf clubs to use, unless they teach beginning and intermediate golfers on a regular basis, their opinions are best for people who play exactly like they do and may not be helpful for you.
  • Stick With Known Brand Names: It’s easy to find lists of the top golf club brands. There is a lot of competition among the brands because selling golf clubs is a huge business, but because of the competition, prices stay relatively close depending on the skill levels of the intended customers. If you find what appear to be fantastic golf club deals on a brand you haven’t heard of, be wary.

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