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I Heart Keenwah: Toasted Tastes Better

quinoa
Image used with permission by copyright holder
Stuck inside on a cold winter day?

We’ve found a great new product from the folks at I Heart Keenwah that will provide the comfort food you’re longing for. We’ve long been fans of the company’s healthy chocolate puffs. Now we’re keyed into their newest product—toasted quinoa. We love the roasted, nutty flavor and ease of preparing.

All you have to do is combine a cup of quinoa with two cups water. Bring to a boil, cover, and then simmer for 15 minutes. Turn off the heat and let sit for another 10 minutes and then enjoy. It’s gluten free, Non-GMO verified, fair trade certified, organic, vegan, and kosher. It’s also a complete source of plant-based protein, containing all nine essential amino acids.

If you want to be more creative than just serving it up straight, here’s a recipe you’ll love:

Roasted Cauliflower & Red Pepper Quinoa Bowl

Ingredients

  • 1 head cauliflower, cut into florets
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • Chopped parsley
  • Olive oil, as needed
  • Red pepper sauce:
  • 1 red pepper, cut into strips
  • 1 head of garlic, peeled
  • 1 cup Toasted Quinoa, plus water as directed
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • Dressing:
  • 1/3 cup tahini
  • 1 Tbs miso paste
  • 1 tsp maple syrup
  • juice of 1/2 a lemon

Method

Combine cauliflower and turmeric and roast at 400° for 35 minutes. On a separate pan, also roast the red pepper and garlic for 25 minutes. Drizzle a bit of olive oil on each to prevent sticking. Cook Toasted Quinoa as directed on the package.

In a small bowl, stir together dressing ingredients. In a food processor, blend the roasted red pepper and garlic with a pinch of salt, a drizzle of olive oil and cumin.

In a large bowl, combine cooked Toasted Quinoa with dressing and chopped parsley. Top with roasted cauliflower and red pepper sauce.

Marla Milling
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Marla Hardee Milling is a full-time freelance writer living in a place often called the Paris of the South, Sante Fe of the…
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