The 5 Best Boxed Wines Money Can Buy

Running low on funds, but still want to get a good vino buzz on in these trying times? Well, we’re here to help. A caveat first: Boxed wine is not going to blow you away with flavor. Like, at all. Instead, it exists as a convenient and cheap way to stock up on a wine that works for everyday drinking. Quantity, not quality, people (it’s also a little classier than housing a few forties). From having a party (remember when those were a thing?) to just making sure you’ve got enough to make it through the weekend, boxed wine will be there for you.

Like canned wine, its boxed brethren has improved over the years. Yes, there’s still Franzia, but there are enough superior options now that you’re better off shelling out a couple of extra bucks for something that won’t make you wince. This writer still highly recommends that you grub while you sip these, as there are only a few out there that really deserve to be enjoyed on their own.

Here are five quaffable, dinner-ready options.

Bota Box Pinot Gris

Bota Box Pinot Gris

It’s hard not to run into the Bota Box brand at most supermarket chains. The central California company produces a bevy of wines, none more easy drinking than the Pinot Grigio. It’s apple and peach-driven with enough acid to suggest there was something more to the winemaker’s approach than just “bag it and tag it.” This one belongs right beside the stove, in between the kosher salt and olive oil.

Alandra Esporão White

Alandra Esporão White

White wines generally fare better in box form and the Esporão is another fine example. The Portuguese blend is surprisingly lively and aromatic – so much so you’d probably guess it came from a bottle if consumed blind. And for those used to the session-like quality of fellow Portuguese whites like Vinho Verde, be advised, the ABV on this one tends on the higher side (14.5%).

Provisions Pinot Gris

Provisions Pinot Gris

Granted, a lot of these companies make something called a Chardonnay. They just don’t taste like Chardonnay. At least with Provisions‘ Pinot Gris, even the most mass-produced riffs resemble something akin to what they’re supposed to be. This one shows grapefruit and tart pear, making it a nice partner for salads, poultry, and seafood. So what if it’s non-vintage — do you really think a box wine is going to express the growing season?

La Vieille Ferme Rosé

La Vielle Ferme Rosé

This wine has become synonymous with brunch and for good reason. It’s a bargain and maintains some personality despite being on the dry end of the spectrum. The boxed version of this release from La Vieille Ferme is no different, with bright strawberry flavors and just enough pizzazz. In fact, the boxed version is better because, well, there’s more of it and a bottomless Mimosa has nothing on a heaping glass of Rosé.

Qunita da Espiga Vino Tinto

Qunita da Espiga Vino Tinto

One of the very few reds that pass the box test, this wine is great for heartier cold-weather fare and barbecue. While a bit heavy in terms of mouthfeel, there’s obvious red and black fruit and a bit of leather and spice. It’s good enough to be the house red at many restaurants, at least during happy hour. And if winter drags, use it as a great base for mulled wine

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