You Can Now Rent Floyd’s Bestselling Furniture Collection. Here’s How

It’s no secret that we’re fans of Floyd, the Detroit-based furniture startup with a line of heirloom-quality modular pieces that fit seamlessly with any décor. We’ve tried the Floyd shelving system, the Floyd couch, and the Floyd platform bed (with the new Floyd mattress!) and fallen head over heels for each one.

However, if you’ve read our effusive reviews of these pieces and still haven’t pulled the trigger, we get it. It’s tough to make the jump from low-cost furniture from Ikea and Amazon to investing in handcrafted pieces built to last. Even when you know the cost is lesser in the long run (because you’re not forced to replace as often), there’s the thorny issue of commitment. How can you be sure if you’re going to like the piece once you get it? Even if you like the way it looks, will it fit into your space? And even if it fits perfectly, what if you find a better apartment or a new job that takes you out of town? What if you just like knowing you have the freedom to home-roam at will? For the modern nomad, even the beautiful blonde looks and reliable integrity of a furniture brand like Floyd can feel like too much of a commitment just yet.

Enter Feather, the furniture rental company designed around urban tumbleweed types like you, which is adding Floyd furniture to its stable. That’s right— alongside Feather’s in-house collection, the brand offers pieces from select designers whose emphasis on style and sustainability matches its own, and as of last month, that includes Floyd. You can rent the Floyd platform bed, the Floyd sofa, or the Floyd shelving system from Feather. Most items cost well under $50 per month, meaning you can furnish a one-bedroom apartment for about $150/month. And if you decide the pieces aren’t for you (which trust us, you won’t), you can swap them out for different items from the Feather catalog. If you move but want to hold onto your Floyd furniture (which trust us, you will), Feather can even send a delivery team to help you pack it up and transport it to your new digs.

After all, Feather was founded to help people live beautifully and comfortably without committing to a long-term relationship with their furniture. By offering high-quality, stylish furniture on rental plans, Feather takes the buyer’s remorse out of designing your ideal interior. You can set up your current pied-a-terre without committing to a permanent décor aesthetic or resigning your dream of giving van-life a try.

And if, by chance, you really fall in love with one of your rental pieces, you can let Feather know you’ve found a keeper. The company will just charge you the balance of the item’s retail price, and you can live happily ever after with the media console/dining table/sectional sofa of your dreams.

Along with the no-obligation “try it out” model, getting your Floyd furniture through Feather offers several other perks. For one thing, it’ll show up in a week or less — no waiting for back orders to get manufactured and inspected before they can finally ship. For another thing, Feather maintains ownership of their entire logistics chain, which means that it is overseeing your customer experience from start to finish. “I’m sure you’ve had the experience where you buy a piece of furniture and then you’re patched off to a third-party delivery service, and you have to deal with them,” Madeline Peters Mesa, Feather’s publicist, tells The Manual. (And yes, in fact, we have.) “But with Feather, you have a customer specialist who guides the whole process for you. We own delivery, assembly, and customer service, so we can ensure you’re having the best possible experience.”

If you’re still reading this, for God’s sake open a new tab in your browser and start redesigning your house around a Floyd rental from Feather. Not knowing what the future holds is no excuse for living in a subpar domestic environment. If anything, an upgrade to your home interior is a great first step to creating the world you want to live in.

For more information, visit livefeather.com

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