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Win a ride in a Hennessey Venom F5

Ride in the world's most powerful ICE car

Hennessey Venom F5 on track
Hennessey

The Hennessey Venom F5 is a pretty rare car, and fewer than 100 may exist when all is said and done. So the chances are, most people won’t ever see one in person outside of a major auto show or similar exhibit. But for those who either don’t have the $2.5 million plus needed to acquire one, or weren’t lucky enough to get on the waitlist, there is still a chance to get a ride in what may be the world’s fastest production car.

Hennessey has partnered with Bring a Trailer and Pennzoil to give one lucky winner a 170 mph+ trip in a Venom F5. The experience is currently being auctioned off, with the winner snagging an all-expenses paid trip to Sealy, Texas. During the trip, the lucky individual will get a ride in the Venom F5, have a private lunch with John Hennessey, tour Hennessey Performance, where the F5 is manufactured, and tour the Shell Technology Center. The winner will also leave with a good amount of exclusive Hennessey Venom F5 merchandise — so they’ll have plenty of mementos to go along with the hot lap that will be forcibly embedded in their memory.

The expenses being covered include domestic round-trip airfare, a two-night stay at Houston’s Post Oak hotel, and transportation to and from Hennessey performance.

It’s all for a very good cause

John Hennessey next to a Venom F5
Hennessey

All of the proceeds, including the auction fees, will be donated to the Wounded Warrior Project, which provides career counseling, mental health support, and rehabilitation care to wounded service personnel. The Project’s programs are free and designed to improve the lives of millions of soldiers, veterans, and their families.

John Hennessey, who has worked with veterans before through the Turner School Program, said: “We are honored to partner with Pennzoil and Bring a Trailer to help our Wounded Warriors. We have the freedom in America to enjoy fast, fun cars and trucks because of the service and sacrifices made by our members of the military along with their families.”

While a five-star hotel, a free lunch, and a branded hat are all appreciated, there is obviously one standout component in this auction. The winner gets to take a seat in a Venom F5 while CEO John Hennessey blasts it around the company’s test track. The hypercar is expected to clock speeds north of 170 mph during the drive, so you’ll really get to experience what 1,817 horsepower feels like.

The no-reserve auction ends on Sunday, June 2. The experience has no set date, and the winner is expected to relay some options to Hennessey. It must be redeemed between August 31, 2024 and June 1, 2025.

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