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Type Hike Offers Visual Reminder of our Stunning National Parks Through Design

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Image used with permission by copyright holder
Given the current political landscape, there’s never been a more important time to support our national park system.

Just like our diversity, the natural beauty of our protected lands is a pretty substantial piece of what makes America so great.

That’s why projects like Type Hike matter.

Founded last summer by designer friends David Rygiol and James Louis Walker, the endeavor invited select designers from around the country to submit poster art celebrating each of America’s National Parks.

“The first one was all invitation,” Rygiol says.

The result was an assembly of more than 45 gorgeous posters thematically representing the essence of each locale.

Image used with permission by copyright holder

With plenty of positive momentum, Rygiol and Walker are set to launch the next lineup of posters May 1 – this time, celebrating our National Lakes and Seashores.

“Many of them see their highest visitor numbers during the summer months, so the timing makes sense,” Rygiol says.

They’ll cover 16 stunning shorelines and lakeshores in total. They opened up the submission process and finalized an impressive contributor list including Portland’s Aaron Draplin and NYC-based Gail Anderson. They encouraged designers to submit ideas related to areas they may have traveled to as a child or had special memories of from a prior trip.

Image used with permission by copyright holder

And just like before, each designer donated his/her time and expertise. 100% of profits will go back to the National Park System.

Rygiol says two official launches of the new collection are on tap, with more later in the year. The first will be at Poler’s Laguna Beach store on May 4-31 and the second will be later in New York City.

This summer, they’re taking Type Hike on the road. They’re teaming up with outfitters Everywhere Goods as the official poster partner for Wander in the West, a series of Instagram meetups celebrating destinations in the Western US.

“One of our big values is collaborations,” Rygiol says.

Image used with permission by copyright holder

In essence, Type Hike is a testament to the power of collaboration for the greater good. The stunning collection of posters certainly offers new perspective on our nation’s natural wonders at a time when they need it most.

With additional projects in the pipeline bringing attention to endangered animals and long-distance trails, that perspective will continue as an important directive in the months to come.

The National Lakes and Seashores Collection will go on sale May 1 here.

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Geoff Nudelman
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Geoff is a former contributor to The Manual. He's a native Oregonian who’s always up for a good challenge and a great hike…
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