Skip to main content

The Next-Gen Alpina B7 is the Luxury Speed Freak of Your Dreams

I have this recurring dream. In it, I’ve made my mark. I’ve reached the top of my field. I’ve earned the awards and acclaim and been handed bags of cash. I’ve retired to a life of solitude in the German Alps. However, given my status, I’m frequently called upon to give lectures. As such, I often need to travel to and from my home to the airport. Here’s where I usually wake up since this is the boring part of the dream. But now, I believe German BMW tuner Alpina has come up with a solution for my premature consciousness: I give you the 205 mph BMW Alpina B7.  

The 2020 Alpina B7 is the latest generation in a long line of faster BMWs built by Alpina. With the tuner’s optimizations, this latest and greatest has become the fastest 7 Series ever constructed. Eschewing the top-spec twin-turbocharged V12 for the lower-spec 4.4-liter twin-turbocharged V8, Alpina works its magic and boosts the B7’s overall output to a stomach-churning 608 horsepower and 590 lb-ft of torque. Further tuning lowers the luxury speed demon’s 0-62 mph to just 3.6 seconds and ups the top speed to the aforementioned 205 mph.

Straightline speed, however, isn’t the Alpina B7’s only trick. With the new dynamic suspension, the Alpina B7, in Alpina Sport + mode, will lower the car half an inch for better handling dynamics and a lower center of gravity. Furthermore, the entire BMW gets an entire visual makeover, including new front and rear fascias and a trick set of Alpina wheels. The Alpina B7 also gets two bespoke Alpina colors, one blue, the other green.

Underneath that new suit is a set of larger brake rotors, a re-tuned version of the BMW’s xDrive all-wheel-drive system, and a variable stainless steel exhaust for a more punchy vocal range.

As for price, well, this is where reality goes back into the dream world for me and most others. Alpina plans to sell the B7 for a cool $142,695. That’s nearly $40,000 more than the car it’s based on. However, all of Alpina’s modifications amount to is a thoroughly revised automobile that’s more than capable in just about any circumstance.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’ll be taking a nap and drifting off into my dream world.

For more on BMW, check out our review of the M850i xDrive.

Editors' Recommendations

Topics
Jonathon Klein
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Jonathon is a former contributor to The Manual. Please reach out to The Manual editorial staff with any questions or comments…
The 1924 Bugatti Type 35: The inspo for 100 years of performance and handling
The Bugatti Type 35 set a mold for record-breaking performance that continues today
Left front three-quarter photo of a Bugatti Type 35 race car,

If cars had DNA, a paint chip or drop of engine oil from the beautiful blue Bugatti Type 35 in the images above and below would prove ancestry to every Bugatti in the past 100 years. Designed and engineered as a pure race car in the early 1920s, the Type 35 set a mold for record-breaking performance that continues to guide the Molsheim, France-based automaker.
Why the 100-year-0ld Bugatti Type 35 matters today

Previous

Read more
A new poll suggests F1 2024 has a viewership problem — here’s why
Red Bull's Max Verstappen's domination bores some fans
Max Verstappen driving a Red Bull F1 race car.

The 2024 F1 Grand Prix racing season has barely begun, but a recent F1 viewership poll by Race.com suggests fans are less enthusiastic now than before the season began. Citing nearly 150,000 votes, the poll results claim 61% of respondents voted they were less excited about the rest of the F1 season than during the pre-season, with only 7% more excited and 32% unchanged. More recent events might swing a new poll in the opposite direction.

According to the poll report, the most common reason for fan disenchantment was Red Bull's Max Verstappen winning the first two races virtually unchallenged, continuing a winning phenomenon of the past two seasons. Well, Max didn't win the third race, the Australian Grand Prix, on March 24. In fact, he didn't even finish the race but retired the car when his right rear brake caught fire.
Why F1 viewership matters

Read more
What is a sprint race in F1?
Sprints add excitement for spectators
Haas F1 team Formula 1 race car on the track.

Formula 1 Grand Prix races are three-day events starting Thursday or Friday. Starting with the 2021 season, a few events have also included a Sprint race. An F1 Sprint race is relatively short and includes the minimum laps required to complete 100 kilometers (62 miles). Most Sprint races last 30 to 45 minutes and, according to FIA F1 Rules and Regulations, must finish within an hour of the race start time.

In contrast, F1 Grand Prix races are longer, consisting of the fewest laps to cover 305 kilometers (190 miles), except in Monaco, where the distance is 257 km (160 miles). Grand Prix races are supposed to finish in two hours unless they are suspended during red flag conditions, which can extend the time to 3 hours.
Why are Sprints important in F1 racing

Read more