The Frank Lloyd Wright-Designed House from ‘Blade Runner’ is For Sale and We Want It

In 1924, a men’s clothing mogul commissioned the country’s leading architect to build a stately pleasure dome on top of a hill in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles. Nearly 100 years later, the edifice still stands, commanding a sprawling view over the metropolis below. Officially, it’s known as the Ennis House. But you probably know it better as the apartment of one Rick Deckard, hard-boiled protagonist of Ridley Scott’s 1982 noir/sci-fi film Blade Runner.

And — hold onto your hats — it’s for sale.

The architect in question was Frank Lloyd Wright, and the home is one of only four built in this particular style. Wright called it his favorite, which is saying something. Even in an urban area as dense with experimental and innovative architectural styles as Los Angeles has always been, the Ennis house stands out as one of the region’s G.O.A.T. That’s not just us saying so — the L.A. Times panel of historians, architects, and preservationists all agreed on it.

Perched on a nearly an acre overlooking some of L.A.’s best views, including the Pacific Ocean on one side and the wilds of Griffith Park on the other, the 6200-square foot home features four bedrooms, three and a half baths, a detached garage with guest quarters, a pool, a koi pond, several built-in works of original art, and a whole lot of movie history. This monumental home has been featured in some of Hollywood’s best sci-fi and adventure movies: The Day of the Locust, Mulholland Drive, The Rocketeer, Rush Hour, Beverly Hills Cop II, and of course, Blade Runner. It also shows up in TV shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Star Trek: The Next Generation, and Invitation to Love, the show-within-a-show on David Lynch’s Twin Peaks. You can even see an animated version of the Ennis House in a South Park episode.

Ennis House
Hilton Hyland

The house was designed to suit the particular tastes of one Charles Ennis, who was super into Mayan art and architecture. Accordingly, Wright customized the geometric outline, as well as the stamped pattern of the concrete blocks, to echo the pyramids of ancient Mesoamerica. Ennis also belonged to the Masonic Order, so Wright went the extra mile and embedded a stylized Greek key into the pattern. (We can just picture Ennis and his Freemason pals standing in front of those floor-to-ceiling windows and saying, with a throaty chuckle, “Together we could own this town.”)

Of course, it wouldn’t be a Frank Lloyd Wright house without innovative touches of the architect’s own devising. Wright used the project to test out a method he called “textile block construction,” where the concrete cubes were threaded together with steel rods that hold them in position. His goal was more than aesthetic — Wright believed concrete held a lot of potential as a material for affordable housing, and the Ennis house gave him the perfect canvas to test his hypothesis.

The interior of the house is just as commanding as the outside but softened by the changing shades of desert light. The sand-toned concrete offers a sun-warmed look to the awe-inspiring spaces and columnar corridors. One guest reported sitting at the dining room table and watching hawks circle overhead. Despite its imposing lines, it honors Wright’s philosophy of naturalism. As he once said, “No house should ever be on a hill … It should be of the hill. Belonging to it. Hill and house should live together, each the happier for the other.”

Ennis House
Hilton Hyland

Over the years, the Ennis house passed from one loving set of multi-millionaire hands to another, each of whom invested hefty sums to keep the interior current and restore the property after the ravages of earthquake tremors and heavy rains. (As much as southern California is reputed to be a paradise, its weather conditions can be pretty hard on a house.) Since 2008, it has been designated as a California Historical Landmark and belonged to the National Register of Historic Places. However, as one of Wright’s most livable houses, L.A. locals and architecture buffs hope that it will go on to serve as the setting for more than just memorable scenes in film and TV. As Wright’s grandson Eric said in 2009, “My grandfather designed homes to be occupied by people. He created the space, but the space becomes a creative force and uplifts when it is lived in every day.”

The Ennis House is jointly listed for sale by Beverly Hills–based real estate agencies Hilton & Hyland and Coldwell Banker for $23 million. Bid now, and you could throw your housewarming party just in time to coincide with Blade Runner’s November 2019 time period. Go on — revel in your time.

It’s not every day that a Frank Lloyd Wright house hits the market (although we have recently seen the Olfelt House, Haddock House, and Norman Lykes House for sale).

Food & Drink

What Makes the World’s Most Expensive Chocolate Worth the Price?

What would you guess the world’s most expensive chocolate costs? Fifty bucks? A Benjamin? Try $350-plus.
Auto

Driving Ford’s New 2019 Mustang Bullitt and Living the McQueen Dream

Given the classic film's history with San Francisco, Ford invited us to take a ride in a Mustang that would make McQueen swoon.
Food & Drink

Comedian Ben Scwhartz on His New Podcast, Learning about Wine, and Desert Island Vino

You probably know Ben Schwartz as one of the stars of House of Lies and Parks and Recreation, but did you know that he also loves wine? He loves it, but for a long time, he’d say he knew next to nothing about it.
Outdoors

Is this the Fanciest (And Most Expensive) Pedal Boat Ever?

We love a regular old pedal boat as much as the next guy, but this one takes the cake.
Living

This Tiny A-Frame Cabin Aims for Zero Environmental Impact

This unique space can be built on a property without a construction permit or the use of heavy machinery.
Living

Naked Labs’ 3D Body-Scanning Smart Mirror Tracks Fitness Progress in Real Time

Mirror mirror on the wall, what are my gains this week?
Living

The Bothy Project Inspires a Hiking Hut Pre-Fab and Artists’ Retreat

We're just waiting for the bothy trend to finally come to the States.
Living

Travel All Over Without Ever Leaving Home in an ESCAPE Tiny House

The latest model comes with a screened-in porch the lets you enjoy the outdoors even more.
Living

The Sheats-Goldstein Residence Is Everything We Want in a House

Even if you don’t know the name, you know the Sheats-Goldstein Residence.
Living

Riviera Residence: A Mid-Century Modern Home is Brought into the 21st Century

A sleek white kitchen, exposed steel beams, and dark woods all give this 1950s home a decidedly 2018 look
Living

Add Style (and Storage) to Your Space with these Exceptional Media Stands

You bought your big-ass TV. Now you need a place to put it.
Living

This Brick House is Like Something Out of a Sci-Fi Movie

A drawbridge, an art gallery, 970,000 bricks — and those aren’t even the most impressive parts.
Living

This Sprawling Irish Estate Puts the ‘Man’ Into Mansion with Its Own Go-Kart Track

Everything about this estate is amazing, but the real reason you need it is the 980-meter go-kart track positioned just outside the main entrance.
Living

Take a Don Draper-Worthy Road Trip in this Vintage $225,000 RV

Everything from the unique shape down to the luxury finishes makes this fully restored travel trailer worth the price. It's even been signed by Chuck Pelly.