Skip to main content

These crazy wireless earphones mold to fit in hot water

decibullz wireless custom molded in ear headphones black and white kickstarter banner
Image used with permission by copyright holder
For years headphone companies have sought to solve one of the most vexing problems of in-ear headphones: the fit. A good fit is a vital component to achieving quality performance. As such, we’ve seen some novel solutions to the custom in-ear conundrum over the years — but the “thermoplastic” design of Decibullz might just take the cake. Borrowing a page from sports mouth guards, Decibullz use hot water to to loosen up a material that molds to your ear canal as it cools. And now, the company has upped the innovation stakes even further with a new wireless option. The kicker? They’re only $90 on Kickstarter right now, with an eventual $150 MSRP.

There are a lot of reasons custom-molded earphones are superior to stock buds. Not only is the sound vastly superior to cookie cutter models, but a good set of molded earphones also offers a high level of noise isolation. That means they not only protect your ears better, but they also isolate the sound for a purer performance. The Ultimate Ears Pro Reference Monitors yours truly uses, for instance, offer up to 26 dB reduction of ambient sound, and unparalleled sonic accuracy. The problem for most folks? These 3D-printed engineering marvels run around $1,000.

Related: Take the studio along with UE Pro’s Reference Remastered in-ears

It’s a foregone conclusion that Decibullz can’t come close to the sonic performance of top-tier in-ears like the UE RM, wireless connection or otherwise. But the new Decibullz Wireless do come with some impressive specs, among them a claimed 40dB reduction of exterior noise! Other features include a machined aluminum base, a claimed five-hour battery runtime, a three-button control microphone, and sweat and water resistance, making these a great bet for your daily jog.

As for customization, the earpieces work by combining their aluminum core with a special “Easy Fit Earpiece,” which goes around the base of the Decibullz, sporting a basic silicone tip. The earpieces soften in hot water, and then cool off quickly “while maintaining their moldable properties,” which is a good thing, since you don’t want to burn the crap out of the inside of your ear canal. The earpieces retain their molded shape once cooled, and can even be remolded multiple times.

One thing we’re not crazy about is the way the wires hang down, which looks a little precarious, and isn’t exactly the most stylish wireless in-ear design we’ve seen. Still, it’s not easy to cut the cord entirely on in-ears — very few companies have accomplished the feat — and the company claims that the length of cabling is what helps the Decibullz preserve battery. We also have to say: the wired portion is a lot less cumbersome than similar designs we’ve seen on the market. The headphones also come in seven different colors.

Decibullz colors
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Of course, we have no idea how the Decibullz Wireless sound, but their first wired option took off swimmingly on Kickstarter and even managed to garner a CES Innovations Award, according to the company.

If you’ve been looking for custom-molded in-ears, but you don’t have the scratch for the pricey stuff, Decibullz might be right up your alley. And the new Decibullz Wireless take the convenience factor even further, making these a prime candidate for more active users.

You can get your hands on the Decibullz Wireless by pledging at the company’s fully-funded Kickstarter campaign until December 12, or simply wait for them to make it to market.

This post was originally published on our “brother site” Digital Trends.

Ryan Waniata
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Ryan Waniata is an audio engineer, musician, composer, and all-around lover of all things tech, audio, and cinema. Hailing…
I spoke to a cigar concierge team, and if you love cigars you should too
Man in pink suit smoking and enjoying what a cigar tastes like.

While smoking isn't always a shared experience — I tend to prefer smoking alone with my thoughts most times — it can be a delightful social activity, especially if you're in good company. It's low-key, so you can smoke, relax, and talk about whatever you want to talk about. That also makes it a fantastic opportunity to conduct an interview. I wanted to take full advantage of that while spending time with someone who knows cigars, a real professional, I might add.

By now, I'm sure you know I love cigars. I have a lot to say about them and a lot to share, like how to rehydrate a dry cigar, explain what a cigar tastes like, or what makes a Maduro cigar different. But one thing I do like to impart to others is the potential to have your very own "cigar guy," or someone you can call for recommendations and advice.

Read more
Will there be a season 2 of Shōgun?
Want to know if Shōgun will last more than one season?
Hiroyuki Sanada in Shogun.

There aren't many shows that debut with a perfect score on Rotten Tomatoes, but FX's adaptation of James Clavell's Shōgun is something special. This is the second time that Shōgun has been adapted for television, and it was also a breakout hit in 1980 when it was hailed as one of the greatest miniseries ever created for TV. It took another 44 years before FX's modern take followed, but this version of Shōgun is already among the contenders for the best TV series of 2024.

Cosmo Jarvis stars in Shōgun as John Blackthrone, an English sailor who is trapped in Japan at the beginning of the 17th century. This was during a time when Japan wasn't particularly welcoming of outsiders. And once Blackthrone proved that he had value, he wasn't allowed to leave. Thus, the show chronicles Blackthrone's transformation as he acclimates to Japan and its people in a time of deadly turmoil.

Read more
How to cut a torpedo cigar: The proper way to prepare the unique size
Torpedo Cigars up close from Oliva, Ramon Bueso, and Padilla.

You don't want to take too much off the top when cutting a cigar, just enough to let the smoke and flavors pass through. But all bets are off when cutting an unusual size, like a torpedo cigar. That's because the head -- the end where you cut -- is shaped like the sharp edge of a torpedo. It comes to a point that can make cutting, at least with traditional cutters and tools, a bit contentious. So, if you've never had the pleasure of smoking a torpedo-style cigar before, you might find yourself a little confused when prepping for the experience. This guide will walk you through how to cut a torpedo cigar, point out some things you might want to know, and I'll even share a few of my favorite torpedo smokes. Let's discuss.
How to cut a torpedo cigar the right way

If you're learning how to cut a cigar, you can always start with our Ultimate Beginner's Guide. The trick is to snip a little off the head, not a huge chunk, to let the smoke pass through the cigar, delivering loads of flavor and nuance as you draw through it. A common mistake beginners make is to chop off too much, especially when using a straight cutter. If this is your first time, I highly recommend -- it's a style of cutter that has a backstop behind the guillotine so you don't chop too much off.

Read more