Marshall’s Latest Headphones Snip the Wires from Top of the Line Model

monitor bluetooth

For some time now, Marshall has been selling headphones that bear the classic look of the company’s amplifiers. In 2016, the company started selling wireless headphones, but only on-ear models were available. That has changed with the release of the company’s new Marshall Monitor Bluetooth headphones.

Like the company’s previous headphones, the Monitor Bluetooth model uses a black-and-gold color scheme, with a hint of white in the form of the Marshall logo emblazoned on the side of the ear cups. While this model is over-ear instead of on-ear, much of the general design and build seems very similar to earlier models like the Mid and Major. Like those models, the Monitor Bluetooth uses cast-metal hinges and an overall rugged build that means the headphones should survive the rigors of everyday use.

The Monitor Bluetooth headphones feature 40mm drivers, similar to the company’s previous wireless models which used drivers of the same size and offered surprisingly warm and detailed sound for the price. Considering this is a wireless version of the older Marshall Monitor headphones, this shouldn’t come as a surprise. Connectivity is provided by Bluetooth with aptX, which may not satisfy audiophiles, but is perfect for those looking to use the headphones on the go.

Aside from the looks, one of the major selling points of the Monitor Bluetooth is the battery life. Marshall claims the headphones are capable of delivering more than 30 hours of playback time on a single charge. If you do happen to run out of battery, the included 3.5mm cable lets you listen in passive mode, and the headphones can be easily charged via the micro USB charging cable. Both of these cables will fit inside the included canvas carrying bag so you always have them with you.

The Marshall Monitor Bluetooth headphones are available starting Thursday, and sell for $250. For more information or to snag a pair for yourself, see the company’s website.

A version of this post first appeared on our “brother site” Digital Trends.