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Charms, Cookies, and Cap’ns: Best Childhood Cereals

Mmm, the cereal aisle. The very reason we went to the grocery store — turning the corner and gazing up at the colorful rows of boxes, knowing one would be ours. That was followed by waking up Saturday morning, pouring a heaping bowl, and basking in the glow of sweet, sugary glory.

If you don’t feel this nostalgic joy about childhood cereals you probably ate oatmeal as a nine-year-old and liked it (bleh).

Lucky Charms

Lucky Charms

Released by General Mills in the 60s, Lucky Charms is a grade-A childhood cereal that we can’t believe our parents let us eat. Other than being pure sugar, Lucky Charms has vitamins and minerals like folic acid, iron, and B-12 according to Livestrong (sure, we can pretend). The experience of eating this cereal is all about the thrill of the hunt, weaving your spoon through a sea of frosted oats to nab horseshoes, rainbows, and moons. And that post-cereal milk… bartender, pour me a double.

Frosted Flakes

Frosted Flakes

All the athletes on the Frosted Flakes boxes did convince our childhood selves we were eating a super-human food. Plus, the sugar-coated corn flakes tasted grrreat. There really was something lean and mean about this cerulean blue box and flexing Tony the Tiger, and you probably ate these before baseball on the weekends (and hit dingers like Big Al). Today, Kellogg’s has taken Frosted Flakes to new highs, creating a seasonal pumpkin spice flavor and hybrid Lucky Charms Frosted Flakes … which is pure madness.

Cap’n Crunch

Cap’n Crunch

Quaker Oats Company tried recreating a recipe of brown sugar and butter over rice and ended up with the oat and corn cereal Cap’n Crunch. The slight peanut-butter taste was the origin of our adult nut butter obsession, and the Cap’n himself, Horatio Magellan Crunch, will remain one of the most iconic cereal mascots of all time. And get this, he’s not even a real captain! Technically this childhood cereal should have been called Commander Crunch.

Fruity Pebbles

Fruity Pebbles

Nobody questioned why The Flintstones’ Fred and Barney were the spokesmen for rice puff cereal Fruity Pebbles (there are some questions you just don’t ask), but you recognized the box by their Neanderthal mugs all the way from the check out. Released by Post Foods in 1971 with twin Cocoa Pebbles, there’s a bizarre phenomenon where Fruity Pebbles tastes different to each person. It’s fruity in that faux fruit way, but some say the cereal tastes like Earl Grey, others say cardboard (heinous), but we think it’s 90s nostalgic heaven.

Oreo O’s

Oreo O’s

The short-lived high of Post Cereals and Kraft Foods lovechild Oreo O’s lasted only a decade between 1997 and 2007. Boy was that a time to be alive. Oreos for breakfast! And parents genuinely thought it was a healthy option. Kraft owned the name and Post owned the recipe, but the two couldn’t get along so they discontinued the O-shaped cookie cereal. Post restarted production another decade later in 2017 with a new real crème filling recipe. It won’t taste exactly the same, but you were like seven so you wouldn’t remember anyway.

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