Who needs stairs? These houses have indoor slides


If you’ve only ever gone down a slide outdoors, you might need some wealthier friends. Indoor slides exist in a few residential homes, and we have the pictures to prove it.

Steve Jones, founder and CEO of ChaCha, has one made of mahogany in his home. It took 18 months to build and cost around $150,000, according to The Wall Street Journal. The Carmel, Indiana, home is hiding a few other surprises, including a secret bookcase and two-story treehouse. Jones gave HGTV a tour of the 1938 manor-style house, which is outfitted with all kinds of home automation, too. His alarm clock opens the blinds and turns on the fire when it’s time for him to get up.

Builder Steve Kuhl transformed an entire bedroom into a pirate ship. It has a hull, a bridge, a wheel … Honestly, it kind of overwhelms the fact that the room also has a secret slide. There are stairs or a rope to climb if you want to take another ride, according to My Modern Met. But Kuhl also put another $9,000 slide in his own home, for his kids to enjoy. Plus, it requires ascending the stairs if they want another ride, he tells WSJ.

Related: 10 homes so lavish they have actual shark tanks inside them

The article also features John and September Higham, who built a slide, zipline, and climbing wall in their Mountain View, California, home for their kids. The whimsical features aren’t entirely surprising for an aerospace engineer and software consultant who quit their jobs to spend a year hauling two kids across 28 countries back in the early 2000s.

A house with an indoor slide might feel like something out of the movie Blank Check, but that doesn’t mean we don’t secretly want one.

East Village Penthouse, Turett Collaborative Architects — New York, New York

In New York City, Turett Collaborative Architects helped a client transform two penthouse condos into a two-bedroom duplex via a connecting slide. There are also stairs, but the stainless steel tube is clearly the best way to go.

Sliding into Home, Coburn Development — Boulder, Colorado

A 4,700-square-foot home with five bedrooms and four bathrooms isn’t exactly small, so the owners decided to add a slide, with the help of Coburn Development.

Skyhouse, David Hotson Architect — New York, New York

In the appropriately named Skyhouse in New York, designed by David Hotson Architect, a slide takes visitors all around the home, even offering access and entry points on different levels.

Greenville Estate, Gabriel Builders — Greer, South Carolina

While it’s not connecting two separate floors, this indoor playhouse’s slide is still exactly one more slide than we had in our homes growing up.

A Pirate’s Life for Me, Kuhl Design — Minneapolis, Minnesota

The amazing orange slide might be the lamest thing about this room, which also features a floating pirate ship, from Kuhl Design.

Prewar Loft, raad studio — Greenwich Village, New York

If our home office, like this one designed by raad studio, had a slide, well, we’d never get anything done.

Stanwood Equestrian Residence, Designs Northwest — Stanwood, Washington

This house, from Designs Northwest, is on the grounds of a horse-boarding facility. Presumably, the slide is not for the ponies.

This was originally a post from our brother site, Digital Trends.