Rohner Socks: “Cult Following”

Rohner-Socks

If you have a Swiss watch or a Swiss Army Knife, you understand the Swiss commitment to precise detail. Same goes for socks—at least those made by the Rohner Company in Switzerland.

“The socks have a cult following in Europe,” says Adrienne Coleon Gaskell, who handles company communications from her office in Vermont. “It’s due to the attention to detail and the real appreciation and cultivation of high-quality knits, fabrics, and technology, all translated into the DNA of this brand.”

Jacob Rohner created the company in 1930 with the goal of creating socks that would excel in performance, quality, comfort, and design. The company now offers 150 varieties of socks, with the ski carving sock among the best sellers.

At the beginning of this year, the company expanded into the U.S. market with 40 of its popular sock choices. Right now, sales are entirely online, but they may branch out into traditional retail stores in time.

While the socks have many features that put them high on buyer’s lists, Gaskell points specifically to the hand linked toe construction.

“In the sock world, the seam of the toe is very important,” she explains. “In the basic run of the mill sock, the seam is raised. In hand linked socks the toes are completely seamless. It requires a special machine that puts the socks together in a unique and meticulous way. The end result is they won’t rub or irritate your feet.”

Socks are offered for skiing, running, and hiking, but they also sell dress socks—the supeR is a fan favorite. Made of fine knit cotton, the company says they won’t slip or cut into legs because of Rohner’s Antislip Tube Technology. They also craft a version out of organic cotton. All knits and fabrics are sourced in Europe.

Gaskell says sales are brisk on the new U.S. site and they haven’t received any returns—which speaks to the high level of customer satisfaction.

For those wanting to test Rohner socks, a savings coupon off their first order is sent out when potential customers sign up for their newsletter.

Ski Carving socks featured in the photo at the top of this article retail for $36.